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Prairie Books Now

Prairie Books Now

Prairie Books Now

These titles may not be what you originally planned to discuss but are great choices available right now! The library has resumed getting books from other libraries, so we may be able to get enough copies of your next discussion title in print. If you need help picking a title or would like a book club packet of reviews and questions, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..These books are available via hoopla, which means that everyone in your group can check out and read (or listen): no wait and no holds. You just need a valid Indian Prairie Public Library card (or if their card is from another library, confirm they have hoopla access).

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This book is packed with gorgeous full-page close-up photos of prairie plants and animals, interspersed with a dozen short essays that include both ecology and natural history tidbits and enthralling and gently humorous anecdotes about Helzer’s experi­ence staring into a tiny bit of prairie for one year. Helzer writes eloquently about the conservation value of prairies and uses his photos and stories to reinforce a conservation ethic among his readers.Throughout its years of continuous publication Prairie Schooner has consistently maintained a national reputation for literary excellence. Building upon this venerable history, the journal selects one short story collection from contemporary writers each year for this prize series. The series is sponsored and vetted by the staff of Prairie Schooner and a venerable committee of judges, and the selected volumes are published each year by UNP. Submission guidelines for the prize series can be found on the Prairie Schooner website: prairieschooner.unl.edu/book-prize.

Sadly, younger generations than mine are more familiar with the saccharine Little House TV series starring an often bare-chested Pa (the late Michael Landon). The books however, were a life raft for me. As a preacher’s kid who was uprooted constantly and showed up as the “new kid” in school on a random Wednesday, I found solace in familiar books. Upon arrival in each new town, my father would take my three sisters and me to the local library where we signed up for library cards. We would check out the maximum weekly allotment of books. Librarians were skeptical when we returned in one week to replenish. “Did you really read all of these?” Of course I did. It took time to make friends in each new place. The eight Little House on the Prairie books were a staple in my life for years. I read each book countless times with no adherence to sequential order. I remember the smell of the pages, those worn hardcovers, and can recall so many of the thrilling pencil illustrations by the great Garth Williams.It was later in life, perhaps when reading the series to my daughter, that I realized an allure these books held for me at a very young age. I was drawn to the thrill of the freedom and liberty sought and fought for by these brave pioneers. While some critics blame Wilder for propelling a myth of successful self-sufficient farm life, free from the need for government intervention, I caught enough nuance to appreciate that it was an excruciatingly difficult life. Every move to a new home was predicated by financial ruin and government loans, laws and railroad routes were critical to motivating the choices the family made. (Source: www.adamsmithworks.org)

 

 

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