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Polygala Root

Polygala Root

Polygala Root

Though Polygala tenuifolia supplementation may slightly increase cognitive ability in elderly people, it has limited effect on healthy adults. Supplementing Polygala tenuifolia can improve spatial organization and recognition, but it does not improve short- or long-term memory formation, as measured by free or cued recall. Much more research is needed to determine if Polygala tenuifolia qualifies as a nootropic.

Polygala

Though Polygala tenuifolia supplementation may slightly increase cognitive ability in elderly people, it has limited effect on healthy adults. Supplementing Polygala tenuifolia can improve spatial organization and recognition, but it does not improve short- or long-term memory formation, as measured by free or cued recall. Much more research is needed to determine if Polygala tenuifolia qualifies as a nootropic.

Traditional medicinal plants possess diverse active constituents for exerting their biological activities. Recently, the innovative applications of plant extracts have revealed their promise as ‘green’ reducing agents for the reduction of metal ions during the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. Herein, we report the use of 70% ethanol extracts from Polygala tenuifolia roots as a ‘green’ reducing agent for the production of gold nanoparticles by reducing gold(III) chloride trihydrate. Gold nanoparticles were characterized using UV-Visible spectrophotometry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The gold nanoparticles had characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands at 535 nm. HR-TEM and AFM images revealed major spherical-shaped nanoparticles. The average diameter was measured to be 9.77±3.09 nm using HR-TEM images. The crystalline structure of the gold nanoparticles was confirmed through lattice fringes and circular spots within the selected area electron diffraction in the HR-TEM images along with the XRD peaks. The gold nanoparticles exhibited enhanced anticoagulant activity, as assessed by activated partial thromboplastin time. The current method is a straightforward, environmentally friendly, and inexpensive method for the production of gold nanoparticles using extracts from traditional medicinal plants. Don't confuse bitter milkwort (Polygala amara) with asarabacca (Asarum europaeum) or senega (Polygala senega). All three plants are sometimes called snakeroot. (Source: www.webmd.com)

 

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