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Pollinator Plants Nj

Pollinator Plants Nj

Pollinator Plants Nj

The term native plant is fluid and can have many different meanings. In general, native plants are species that were present at the beginning of the European settlement of North America. These plants , over time, have evolved to grow in a specific region. Native plants have established complex relationships with other native plants, insects and animals, some of which are dependent on one another to thrive. Generally, native plants naturally occur within a radius of 100 miles of your area and many can do well with a minimum of care once established.

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Native plants have evolved to thrive in a specific region, and within specific ecosystems. These plants, when situated in the proper environment, support their ecosystems more diversely than exotic plantings. While many homeowners have incorporated flowering plants in their landscapes to attract certain birds and butterflies, the habitat needed to support insect life is greatly needed. Exotic plants may offer a nectar source for wildlife, but in many cases their leaves, fruits, pollen and nectar are not the preferred food of our vital native insects and wildlife. The lack of proper habitat and food sources for native birds and insects is one factor in the decline of many of these species in the United States.The reliance on standard exotic landscape plants leads to predictable landscapes regardless of the region. This creates a loss of regional aesthetic identity. Homeowners who desire for pristine landscapes have created residential properties devoid of leaf and plant litter. With proper planning you can maintain a more natural landscape using native plants, saving money on fertilizers and achieving a lower maintenance landscape.

By acquiring grants and reaching out to various local businesses and organizations, the garden was slowly coming to fruition. Support from the Home Depot Foundation and employees added the permeable paved pathway while with help from the local Rotary Club, we acquired a split rail fence around the property. A donation from ShopRite of West Caldwell gave us the opportunity to purchase plants for the gardens. Other donations came from the Somerset County Soil Conservation District, the Passaic/Essex/Union Soil Conservation Service, and the Pinelands Nursery. Volunteers helped in remediating the soil, clearing the area of rocks and construction material and planting the gardens. Among the groups helping the project to succeed were the Boy Scouts, students of James Caldwell High School and Caldwell-West Caldwell Middle School, students of Caldwell University and Montclair State University, St. Aloysius Green team members, Essex County Master Gardeners, the Caldwell Council and the Caldwell Environmental Commission members including its garden committee. (Source: caldwell-nj.com)

 

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