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Pollen count Los Angeles

Pollen count Los Angeles

Pollen count Los Angeles

The city of Los Angeles has been playing the blame game this week. The city contaminated hotel and restaurant guests while they enjoy the mild weather, leaving them with respiratory issues.One of the most striking features of pollen allergy is its seasonal nature--people experience it symptoms only when the pollen grains to which they are allergic are in the air. Each plant has a pollinating period that is more or less the same from year to year. Exactly when a plant starts to pollinate seems to depend on the relative length of night and day, geographical location, and variations in weather patterns.

POLLEN

In Southern California, we experience astronomically high pollen counts starting in December/January. Just as that season ends, other tree pollens become a problem all the way until June. Grass pollen can cause allergy issues March through September. Fall sees a spike in other weed pollens from August through November. Mold spores float through the air like pollen, with levels peaking in late summer.Living in Los Angeles, if you are allergic to all of the different pollens, there are really no months that we don’t encounter some sort of pollen. The lowest pollen count months in Los Angeles are November, December and January. Although there have been some years where even those months we have had elevated pollen counts. If you are suffering from seasonal or perennial allergies it may be a good idea to consult with an allergy specialist to figure out what you are allergic to and how to best manage your symptoms. Allergy testing is a simple procedure performed in the office and you can know very quickly whether or not you are allergic to these pollens.

Each spring, summer, and fall tiny particles are released from trees, weeds, and grasses. These particles, known as pollen, hitch rides on currents of air. Although their mission is to fertilize parts of other plants, many never reach their targets. Instead, they enter human noses and throats, triggering a type of seasonal allergic rhinitis called pollen allergy, which many people know as hay fever. Of all the things that can cause an allergy, pollen is one of the most widespread. Short of staying indoors when the pollen count is high--and even that may not help--there is no easy way to evade windborne pollen. (Source: www.entdoctorslosangeles.com)

 

 

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