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Planting Burning Bush Spacing

Planting Burning Bush Spacing

Planting Burning Bush Spacing

Burning bush is a striking shrub, with fiery scarlet foliage throughout the fall. This bush is as low-maintenance as it is dazzling, making it exceptionally easy to grow as either a single bold specimen plant or in a bright red row to form a low privacy screen. The visual interest extends beyond the fall, once the leaves have fallen, especially when they’re new. Young burning bush shrubs have distinct ridges on their green-brown stems.It’s important to note that Burning bush is considered an invasive species in certain parts of the country, including areas in the Northeast, Midwest, and South. You can find out if the plant is invasive in your area by contacting your local cooperative extension or your local garden center.

Bush

Burning bush is considered invasive in certain areas because it can threaten existing plants and biodiversity. The bush is dominant and seeds prolifically, which means it can force out other plants, especially herbaceous and native woody plant species. Some nurseries have discontinued selling them for this reason, while those that do sell them must state that the plants are invasive. We encourage you to check with local garden centers or the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health to see if the plant is invasive in your region or not.Few people would peg a burning bush (Euonymus alatus 'Compactus') as a troublemaker. Using conventional logic, troublemakers tend to keep a low profile to avoid drawing attention to themselves. But there sits the fiery and usually spectacular burning bush, the showy one that seems to enjoy being the life of any landscape party. If you've fallen for this striking shrub, you can turn its mischievous qualities to your advantage as you create a burning bush landscape like no other.

But keep in mind that it's likely to come roaring back. In fact, even a trim will probably trigger its troublemaker tendencies since it's considered an invasive species in certain parts of the United States, especially the Midwest, South and Northeast, This Old House reports. In these areas, the burning bush is considered a full-fledged threat to native plants because of its affinity for forests, fields, groves and other areas where it's free to “outcompete” with these plants and spawn new rows of scarlet growth.When planting, take into consideration your USDA planting zone and your final purpose for the burning bush 'Compacta' plantings. Severe yearly pruning will keep a 'Compacta' from expanding to its full height and width, if you want to maintain a low hedge, but it will also cut away the showiest section of fall color, as the tip growth generally is the most brilliant red. If you want a hedge or continuous backdrop planting of 'Compacta,' plant the bushes seven feet apart in northern climates (zones 3 & 4), and 10 feet apart in zone 5 and south. Until the bushes grow to their full width, you'll want to fill in the gap with tall perennials or perhaps with other short-lived shrubs. (Source: www.gardenguides.com)

 

 

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