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Plant Red Stem White Berries

Plant Red Stem White Berries

Plant Red Stem White Berries

This plant makes a nice, low-maintenance, ornamental addition to your landscape. In fact, because most wild animals (besides birds) ignore the berries, they tend to stay on the plants for a long time to provide visual interest. White baneberry is a native, not invasive, species, meaning it won’t upset the natural balance of flora. And it’s not that vigorous of a spreader in your garden; it typically stays contained to the area where you want it.White baneberry (Actaea pachypoda), also known as doll's eyes, is a popular plant to grow in gardens due to its striking visual interest. In addition to its clusters of tiny white flowers, the plant produces white berries with deep purple "pupils" that give them the appearance of a doll's eyes.

White

White baneberry is fairly easy to get rid of because it’s not a vigorous spreader. To remove your plant, first, saturate the soil around it to make it easier to slide out the plant. Then, dig around the plant’s root ball and gently pry it out of the ground. Aim not to break the roots, as any piece of root left in the soil potentially can grow a new plant. Spend some time digging in the soil for remaining roots, and remove any you see. Remember to wear gardening gloves for this process, and carefully dispose of all the pieces of the plant.There are two baneberry species commonly found in understory wooded areas of the Midwest. Red baneberry (A. rubra) is more widely distributed, throughout most of North America in zones 3-7 except in the southeastern US, while white baneberry (A. pachypoda) is found primarily in the eastern and Midwest in zones 3-8. Both species are found in moist, nutrient rich sites on many soil types and in a variety of ecosystems including deciduous, coniferous, and mixed forests, and along stream banks, in swamps and in other moist locations.

These herbaceous perennials emerge from a rhizome in the spring, producing one to several branching stems. Each stem has either three leaves that branch near the top, or three compound leaves and one flower stalk from the main central stem. White baneberry grows up to 2-3 feet tall and 2-3 feet wide; red baneberry tends to be smaller in stature than white baneberry, typically only to 2 feet tall and one foot wide. The leaves of the two species are virtually identical. Each compound leaf has 2-3 deeply lobed and coarsely toothed leaflets and hairy veins on the underside. Sometimes leaves are tripinnate, with the 3 primary leaflets further subdivided into 3-5 (rarely 7) leaflets. The lower leaf surface is slightly paler in color than the upper surface. The plants flower for about 3 weeks in late spring or early summer, producing a flower spike (raceme) covered with clusters of small white flowers. The raceme of white baneberry is generally taller than wide, while that of red baneberry tends to be as wide as it is tall. Each individual ¼ inch flower has 4-10 widely spreading white petals, 15-40 large and showy stamens and a pistil with a very short, stout stigma. The numerous stamens give each cluster a feathery appearance. The slightly fragrant flowers lack nectar and provide only pollen but are still attractive to some insects such as flies, bees and beetles. (Source: hort.extension.wisc.edu)

 

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