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Pink Butterfly Milkweed

Pink Butterfly Milkweed

Pink Butterfly Milkweed

A new type of milkweed has been discovered by scientists in the Bb. Hope populations of this unusual plant have been found on the peninsulas of the San Joaquin and Sacramento Rivers. It was only found in populations of about one to five plants. These plants are a magnificant grad the white flowers and it has become popular among the butterfly species that visit California.Rose Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) is a showy pink blooming Asclepias species that is a food plant for Monarch butterfly caterpillars and a nectar source for adult butterflies. Also called Swamp Milkweed, this milkweed actually grows well in both moderately moist and wet soils. This perennial milkweed is also an excellent choice for rain gardens. Asclepias incarnata (also known as Swamp Milkweed) native range: AL, AR, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, GA, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MO, MT, NC, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NV, NY, OH, OK, PA, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VA, VT, WI, WV, WY. Asclepias (Milkweed) are sun loving plants that are essential perennials for monarch butterflies providing food for caterpillars and nectar for adult butterflies. They bloom from mid-summer into early fall and, with their milky sap, are resistant to rabbits and deer.

Butterfly

Most Asclepias species are late to wake up in the spring, and will often be shipped as dormant plants. Don't despair if your milkweed is asleep. The white roots and woody crown are alive just waiting for consistently warm weather to wake up and begin to grow.these perennial species stay dormant later in the spring than many other plants, especially when they are grown in pots. It's fine to plant dormant plants; don't up-pot them for planting later in the growing season.Asclepias incarnata (Swamp Milkweed) is an erect, clump-forming perennial prized for its brilliant clusters of fragrant, lilac-pink flowers, which bloom continuously for weeks from mid to late summer. Sitting atop upright branching stems, clad with stiff, lance-shaped, taper-pointed leaves, the colorful umbels give way to attractive seed pods in the fall, which persist into winter. The flowers are a great source of nectar for bees, beneficial insects and butterflies. Milkweeds are hosts plants for the monarch butterfly. Milkweed plants are critical to the monarch butterflies survival, whose population in North America has plummeted by 90% in the last 20 years. By planting milkweed in your own garden, you can help reverse the fortune of these beautiful insects!

Winter doesn’t necessarily seem like the best time to be starting seeds outdoors in most of North America, but for one very valuable group of plants – the milkweeds – winter is the perfect time to get planting. In case you aren’t familiar with this particular group of plants, milkweeds are in the genus Asclepias, and they are the sole monarch butterfly host plant. Before we dive into how to grow these wonderful plants from seed, let me introduce you to some of the very best milkweed species for monarchs. When planting milkweed in your garden, it’s important to choose a species of milkweed that’s native to your region whenever possible. Thankfully, there are several milkweed species that have a broad native range and are suitable for planting across much of North America. As we dive into the following list of my favorite varieties of perennial milkweed, know that these particular species are good for most parts of the continent. I am not including the annual known as tropical milkweed (Asclepias curassavica) on my list because it is a plant that’s much debated. There’s evidence that it negatively impacts monarch health and migration in some parts of the country. Plus, it isn’t perennial, nor is it native to the U.S. or Canada. (Source: savvygardening.com)

 

 

 

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