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Onion Like Plant Flowers

Onion Like Plant Flowers

Onion Like Plant Flowers

The wild onion multiplies quickly, spreading by bulbs and seeds, and it is very hard to remove once established. Like Oxalis, it can be controlled by digging up the entire plant, including the bulbs. But unlike Oxalis, which pulls up easily (thus giving me a false, yet satisfying, sense of accomplishment), wild onion snaps at the soil level every time I try to pull it up. So the entire plant must be dug up, which is difficult to do given the extent of its spread throughout the yard, its proximity to other more desirable plants, and the depth to which I must to dig. And I think that’s what I find so aggravating about the wild onion. I could quit work and dig wild onions for the rest of my days, but I’m still fairly sure that I will not prevail. It spreads so quickly and so thoroughly! So at best, I try to content myself with digging a few plants and snapping off the flower stalks so that the plants don’t spread even more via seed. I know there are worse weeds, but this wild onion is the one onion that makes me want to cry.

Flower

Many hundreds of Allium species exist, but only a modest few have made a name for themselves as garden plants. The ornamental onions distinguish themselves by their great diversity in color, inflorescence and flowering height. Many species bloom in early summer - just after the spring-flowering period and just before the exuberant full bloom of summer. All species can be used in the border. Certain small species are just perfect for a rock garden, and several lend themselves to naturalizing. Onion weed grows from a small parent bulb and spreads underground by producing additional tiny bulbils that grow into dense crowded clumps of foliage. It also spreads rapidly around the garden through seeds cast from pods that form on the three-cornered stems after flowering. Onion weed can form a dense carpet of foliage that suppresses the growth of other plants. It dies back, absorbing nutrients from foliage in autumn down into the bulbs, and then re-grows new foliage in the spring. It is a persistent weed and one that is hard to completely eradicate.

Onion weed has slender, light green strap-like leaves that sprout in clumps and can grow to around knee height. Just like a snowdrop or a daffodil, flower stems appear from the middle of the leaves in spring and early summer producing clusters of pure white drooping flowers that open above the foliage. The flower stems themselves are characteristically three-cornered. The easiest way to confirm that you are looking at onion weed is to crush any part of the plant – it will smell of onions. The good news is that every part of this plant is edible and it can be treated a bit like a spring onion or baby leek. Allium triquetrium (snowbell) is a plant you might have considered as many other things, possibly a white bluebell, wild garlic or maybe a snowdrop. This could be why it has attributed so many names, most commonly; three-cornered garlic, three-cornered leek, onion weed, three-sided snowbell, to name a few. It can be identified by its garlic /onion smell, its three narrow leaves and an upright three angled stem that bears white bell shaped flowers. The plant is about 30cm high. (Source: www.connswatergreenway.co.uk)

 

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