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Nursery 

Nursery 

Nursery 

nursery, place where plants are grown for transplanting, for use as stock for budding and grafting, or for sale. Commercial nurseries produce and distribute woody and herbaceous plants, including ornamental trees, shrubs, and bulb crops. While most nursery-grown plants are ornamental, the nursery business also includes fruit plants and certain perennial vegetables used in home gardens (e.g., asparagus, rhubarb). Some nurseries are kept for the propagation of native plants for.

Crop

Each year, one of the first questions both seasoned and new nursery producers, managers and owners asks is, “What plants should be propagated and/or grown in the upcoming season(s)?” Answering this question requires a complex equation of inputs ranging from the type of nursery operation that exists to physical location and market trends. For this reason, the answer to this question varies for each person or business. This publication describes several important factors that must be considered to properly assess which ornamental crops should be grown and which market niches exist that may dictate crop selection. A nursery is often defined by its method of production (e.g., container or field), its market (e.g., landscapers, wholesale or retail), the crops grown (e.g., a tree nursery or perennial nursery) or the sizes of plants sold (e.g., a liner nursery or balled and burlapped [B&B] tree nursery). Crop selection is a critical component of nursery production, marketing and sales. The types and diversity of crops and plant sizes have a great impact on a nursery?s ability to market plant material to the appropriate target audience and realize maximum profitability (i.e., economic sustainability). The types and sizes of crops grown may influence the following:

Physical input costs (containers, fertilizer, chemicals, water, etc.) are not the only factors related to crop selection. Other major factors that may influence crop selection include market trends, environmental issues, production costs, location, marketing, shipping, government regulations and energy costs. In general, these factors can be grouped into those that increase the cost of production and those that decrease the cost of production. Those factors that increase the cost of production lead to a higher per-unit cost, resulting in the need to grow a higher-value crop or increase prices. Conversely, those factors that reduce per-unit cost result in less of a need to grow high-value crops (e.g., patented plants) and allow crops to be sold at a competitive, lower cost. Conversely, land costs and property taxes are typically much higher in urban areas compared to rural areas. Urban counties also may have more stringent regulations on use of land, water and pesticides. Additionally, payroll costs are often much higher near urban areas, where competition for unskilled labor is greater. These factors increase production costs and result in the need to grow higher-value crops or increase prices. However, urban and suburban areas may provide a better market for nursery land if a grower decides to liquidate assets. (Source: extension.uga.edu)

 

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