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Northern Sea Oats Height

Northern Sea Oats Height

Northern Sea Oats Height

One of the most shade tolerant of the ornamental grasses, Chasmanthium latifolium (Northern Sea Oats) is a robust spreading deciduous grass. It is noted for its distinctive, drooping seed heads, in late summer, which hang from slightly arching stems and flutter when caressed by the softest of breezes. This grass provides good fall color with its seed heads turning purplish bronze and its bright green leaves warming up to a coppery color after frost. Excellent for dried flower arrangements.

Sea Oat

Add texture to your landscape with Northern sea oats. This easy-to-grow native grass stands just 2 feet tall and reveals flat green seed heads in midsummer that slowly turn bronze then copper by early fall. The slightest breeze flowing through a clump of grass will rustle the dry seed heads, creating a pleasing type of garden music. Northern sea oats is a fabulous cutting flower. Snip the seed stems shortly after they begin to turn bronze for a long-lasting fresh or driedbouquet.Northern sea oats are native to moist, woodland edges which makes them a great addition to part-shade gardens. Create a woodland meadow with a collection of shade-tolerant grasses. You'll love the easy-care aspect of a meadow planting and count on a bounty of color and texture year-round. Other great grasses for part-shade sites include tufted hair grass (Deschampsia cespitosa), Korean feather reed grass (Calamagrostis brachytricha), Japanese forest grass (Hakonechloa macra), and sedges.

Northern sea oats is an upright-narrow to arching perennial with rhizomes. It does very well in rock gardens and as an accent or specimen plant. Flowering occurs from June to September. The flat, green seedheads turn rusty, tan, brown or bronze lasting all winter. The seed heads along with the bronze foliage provide excellent winter interest. Northern sea oats can sometimes become invasive due to the large amount of seed that falls to the ground and germinates along with its rhizome habit of growth. Northern sea oats does well on fertile, light to heavy well-drained soils. It prefers moist sites but will tolerate some drought. In full sun northern sea oats is lighter green than plants grown in partial shade. It does best in partial shade. Very popular as a low-maintenance shade grass, Inland sea oats is notable for its large, graceful seedheads. Sending up blue-green basal leaves in earliest spring, it can be 2 feet tall and a vivid green by May, with translucent green seedheads swaying in the breeze. By mid-summer, the seeds will have turned an attractive ivory and will turn brown in a few months before dropping off. It passes through most of winter a soft brown, but becomes tattered and gray by February, a good time to cut it back to the basal rosette. It reseeds easily and can expand aggressively within a couple of years, making a solid mat in moist loams. It has been used to prevent soil erosion along streams. The seed stalks are attractive in flower arrangements. (Source: www.wildflower.org)

 

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