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Natures Best Landscapes

Natures Best Landscapes

Natures Best Landscapes

In Nature’s Best Hope, Doug Tallamy takes topics from his popular book Bringing Nature Home (Workman Publishing, 2009) and expands upon them. He explains, with examples and statistics, what is happening to the ecological systems around us, and why we should care. This book is geared toward the private landowner – not one whose primary landscaping concern is how green their lawn is – but one who could also be convinced to be concerned about the alarming decline of birds, insects, and other wildlife.

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In the second part of the book Tallamy delves into the “how,” explaining why focusing on the removal of invasive plants and the establishment of native plants on private landscapes is the best way to combat the decline of habitat. He further argues that by incorporating “keystone” plants, we can support a large number of insect species. The large number of insect species then supports a diversity of other wildlife. Tallamy makes a strong case that with enough property owners following that strategy, we will not only help stop the decline of wildlife, but we will begin to turn the tide.Angela Tanner has worked at the intersection of the built and natural worlds for over 15 years. With a background in both architecture and landscape architecture, she strives to create environments that are beautiful and functional for the people, plants, and wildlife that inhabit them. She is a Landscape Architect at Jenick Studio, a Cape Cod based landscape architecture and conservation planning firm specializing in the integration of ecology and modern design.

Gardeners at all experience levels will gain inspiration and pointers from this book, but it is not a step-by-step guide to designing a wildlife garden. Beyond a few examples, it doesn’t tell you which plant species you should use. Those choices depend on your region and site conditions. Tallamy offers resources: places to go to find that information, and guidelines on where to start. He suggests ways to layer plant types to get more benefit out of small spaces, and how to maintain them. Many insects and other wildlife hibernate under leaves and soil in the wintertime. There is no point, as he illustrates with a photo of a tree stuck in a lawn, in supporting moths and other beneficial insects with a host tree, if the ground below is so densely compacted and devoid of plant matter, that insects cannot complete their life cycle.Angela Tanner has worked at the intersection of the built and natural worlds for over 15 years. With a background in both architecture and landscape architecture, she strives to create environments that are beautiful and functional for the people, plants, and wildlife that inhabit them. She is a Landscape Architect at Jenick Studio, a Cape Cod based landscape architecture and conservation planning firm specializing in the integration of ecology and modern design. (Source: www.ecolandscaping.org)

 

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