FutureStarr

Native Catalogue

Native Catalogue

Native Catalogue

However, it is legally listed as endangered in New Jersey and threatened in Ontario. In Ontario it is threatened by habitat loss, invasive species, and a reduction or elimination of natural wildfire. There are under 15 populations known to remain in the province, most of which are within the city of Windsor. To protect these populations, tens of thousands of willowleaf aster plants were moved out of construction areas and replanted elsewhere during construction of the Rt. Hon. Herb Gray Parkway.

List

We value all our Pacific Northwest natives, but focus on growing what we call the superstars of restoration; these are the species we have seen thrive even with rough handling, poor soil, and more or less shade or water than expected (see Superstar list, page 28). We also grow some of the more finicky natives, but recommend special treatments to help them succeed; see species descriptions for specific details. Please contact us if you want a species that we do not list in this catalog. A new field guide to native and naturalized plants of the Seattle area. This book fills in some gaps left by other guides, including the many weeds and other naturalized species found alongside the natives. Species descriptions emphasize ornamental attributes and are accompanied by line drawings. There are also species lists for different habitat types and recommendations for appropriate wild flower mixes. Includes some typos and no keys.

For Native peoples of the Pacific Northwest, winter is a time of dance and performance. Among Northwest Coast peoples, including the Kwakwaka’wakw, Makah, and Nuu-chah-nulth represented here, masks are an essential part of important winter ceremonials, which reenact the adventures of hero-ancestors and spirit beings in the mythological past. The rights to these ritual dances have been passed down in families as treasured privileges, and while the themes are similar, the ceremonies vary in detail from region to region.In Alaska, Yup’ik and Inupiaq peoples honor animals in a variety of ceremonies, the most important of which are the great midwinter hunting festivals. Historically, masks carved by shamans or under their supervision were worn in special dances to please the spirits. As intermediaries between people and spirits, shamans learned the wishes of game animals from visions and trips to the spirit world. Masks could also represent the shaman’s spiritual helpers, which he would try to influence in times of need. Sometimes hung in houses to ward off harmful spirits, masks were also occasionally placed with the dead or used in non-spiritual contexts for popular entertainment. The Yup’ik and Inupiaq masks shown here were made primarily for sale to non-Native customers. (Source: mnch.uoregon.edu)

 

 

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