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Nard for Sale

Nard for Sale

Nard for Sale

While you might appreciate spikenard’s fragrance or its use in religious ceremonies, more information is needed to determine whether this herb has the purported medicinal benefits that alternative practitioners suggest. Here, we cover what’s known about spikenard so far.Disclaimer: Always check with the business for pricing and availability of menu items. SinglePlatform is not responsible for menu or pricing changes, but the information is believed to be accurate when posted. Listing of a menu does not mean that there is any affiliation, endorsement or sponsorship between SinglePlatform and the listed business.

Nard

Nardostachys jatamansi is a flowering plant of the honeysuckle family that grows in the Himalayas of Nepal, China, and India. In bloom, the plant grows to about 1 meter (3 ft) in height and has small, pink, bell-shaped flowers. It is found at an altitude of about 3,000 to 5,000 m (9,800 to 16,400 ft). Its rhizomes can be crushed and distilled into an intensely aromatic, amber-colored essential oil with a thick consistency. Nard oil is used as a perfume, an incense, and as an herbal medicine. Pliny's Natural History lists several species of nardus used in making perfume and spiced wine: Indian nard, a stinking nard called 'ozaenitidos' which is not used, a false nard ('pseudo-nard') with which true nard is adulterated, and several herbs local to Europe and the Eastern Mediterranean which are also called nardus, namely Syrian nard, Gallic nard, Cretan nard (also called 'agrion' or 'phun'), field nard (also called 'bacchar'), wild nard (also called 'asaron'), and Celtic nard. Celtic nard is the only species Pliny mentions which he does not describe when listing the species of nard in book 12 of Natural History suggesting it is synonymous with another species, probably with the species Pliny refers to as 'hirculus', a plant Pliny attests to growing in the same region as Gallic nard and which he says is used to adulterate Gallic nard. Both are widely assumed to be cultivars or varieties of Valeriana celtica.

Indian nard refers to Nardostachys jatamansi, stinking nard possibly to Allium victorialis, false nard to Lavandula stoechas, Syrian nard to Cymbopogon nardus, Gallic nard to Valeriana celtica, Cretan nard to Valeriana italica (syn. V. dioscoridis, V. tuberosa), and wild nard to Asarum europaeum. Field nard, or 'bacchar', has not been conclusively identified and must not be confused with species now called "baccharises" referring to species native to North America.Commonly called False Valerian because it shares many of its attributes, but it is cheaper. Use for allergies, inflammation, insomnia, mature skin, migraine, nervous indigestion, rejuvenating properties, rashes, stress and tension of all kinds. (Also known as False Indian Valerian Root Oil, Nard, Narde.) A very spiritual oil, supposedly used by Mary Magdalene to anoint the feet of Jesus Christ. Used extensively in devotional ritual and meditation. Highly recommended! (Source: www.newdirectionsaromatics.com)

 

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