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Mentha aquatica

Mentha aquatica

Mentha aquatica

The species that make up the genus Mentha are widely distributed and can be found in many environments. Most grow best in wet environments and moist soils. Mints will grow 10–120 cm (4–48 inches) tall and can spread over an indeterminate area. Due to their tendency to spread unchecked, some mints are considered invasive.

Mentha

This section may lack focus or may be about more than one topic. In particular, it treats the genus Mentha ("mint") as if it were a single kind of plant, whereas many of the uses apply only to one species or cultivated variety of the genus. Please help improve this article, possibly by splitting the article and/or by introducing a disambiguation page, or discuss this issue on the talk page. (July 2019)Exhaustive studies have been made to understand the role of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) requirements on herbage production and essential oil yield. Indeed, N application at 160 kg N/ha for M. arvensis, 125 kg N/ha for M. × piperita, 100–120 kg N/ha for M. aquatica and M. spicata give a higher dry matter amount and essential oil yield [48,49,50]. Helsel and Fluck [51] have shown a correlation between N fertilizer application and (−)-carvone and limonene concentrations in Mentha × gentilis L. Generally, 80–120 kg N fertilizer, 50 kg P

Essential oils are usually detached from aqueOne of the most popular and representative plant groups is the Lamiaceae family. Nowadays, it is used both in traditional and modern medicine, as well as in the pharmaceutical and food industries. The use of mint is not strictly limited to essential oils, which are widely recognized for their strong aromatic properties. Indeed, essential oils and their derived extracts can be effectively used as natural food preservatives. As a result, they can fulfill several important tasks: prolong shelf-life, eliminate synthetic preservatives and food flavors, as well as forming part of a healthy food trend that influences market sales.Characteristically appearing in their liquid, volatile, limpid and rarely colored form, essential oils also display a good solubility in lipids and organic solvents, often having lower densities than that of water [81]. Odorous secondary metabolite biosynthesis in Mentha species occurs in peltate glandular trichomes, specialized epidermal tissues located on leaves, stems, petals and seed coat surfaces, depending on the species [59,60].A wide range of other chemical constituents, mostly phenolic compounds, are also present in mint tissues [144], as briefly shown in Table 2. Interestingly, it should be highlighted that rosmarinic acid, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, salvianolic acid, eriocitrin and hesperidin have been found to be the major non-volatile constituents in Mentha species [145]. (Source: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov)

 

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