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Marching through georgia

Marching through georgia

Marching through georgia

The following article is about one of the trials I had in my life. Helping kids who are struggling to read and understand is something I have a passion for. It's also something that I believe will change the fate of many lives for the better. In this article, I will not only share my insights behind the experience, but I'll also talk about the difference between knowledge and wisdom, and how it's based on how you interpret pieces of information.

CIVIL WAR

“Marching through Georgia” became a popular tune for parade bands and inspired later composers, including Charles Ives. In Ives’s early-twentieth-century composition for orchestra Three Places in New England, the first movement, “The 'St. Gaudens’ in Boston Common,” features a medley that interweaves Work’s tune with Root’s “Battle Cry of Freedom” and an old plantation song, “Old Black Joe.” “Marching through Georgia” remains a recognizable song. It may be heard in the film Gone With the Wind (1939) and was used by Ken Burns in his documentary The Civil War (1990). Princeton University, in Princeton, New Jersey, once adopted the tune as its football fight song. “Marching through Georgia” is a five-stanza song with a recurring chorus and was published with a piano accompaniment. Like many Civil War songs, it served as a rallying cry for the North, even though the song did not appear until after the war had ended. Some historians have attributed the song’s popularity to its morale-boosting effect as a celebration of the triumphant end of the war. As a testament to freedom and sacrifice, its inspirational lyrics also contain a comic undertone.

Work, a Connecticut native living in Chicago, Illinois, when the war broke out, was a printer by trade as well as a self-taught musician. In 1861 he signed a contract to produce sheet music for Root and Cady, a Chicago publishing firm. The firm’s George F. Root was himself a well-known composer of popular music and Civil War songs.With the many boys who fought in the civil war most of them lied about their age. A lot of them wrote letters or had a diary. Johnny Clem had run away from his home at 11. At age 12 he tried to enlist but they refused to let him join because he was clearly too young. The next day he came back to join as a drummer boy. (Source: americancivilwar.com)

MARCH

“Marching through Georgia” became a popular tune for parade bands and inspired later composers, including Charles Ives. In Ives’s early-twentieth-century composition for orchestra Three Places in New England, the first movement, “The 'St. Gaudens’ in Boston Common,” features a medley that interweaves Work’s tune with Root’s “Battle Cry of Freedom” and an old plantation song, “Old Black Joe.” “Marching through Georgia” remains a recognizable song. It may be heard in the film Gone With the Wind (1939) and was used by Ken Burns in his documentary The Civil War (1990). Princeton University, in Princeton, New Jersey, once adopted the tune as its football fight song.The first stanza calls for the rallying of the troops with the bugle call. The second stanza claims that sweet potatoes popped out of the ground as the “Yankees” approached. The third stanza is a nostalgic account of the Union soldiers as they see their flag raised. In the fourth stanza, the comedic tone returns with reference to “saucy rebels” who did not think the Northern troops could reach the coast. The final stanza describes the 300-mile-long march to the sea, in which the Union army, in a 60-mile-wide column, “made a thoroughfare for freedom and her train.” The chorus is written in four-part harmony for soprano, alto, tenor, and bass, to be performed by a group of people in response to a soloist singing the stanzas.

“Marching through Georgia” is a five-stanza song with a recurring chorus and was published with a piano accompaniment. Like many Civil War songs, it served as a rallying cry for the North, even though the song did not appear until after the war had ended. Some historians have attributed the song’s popularity to its morale-boosting effect as a celebration of the triumphant end of the war. As a testament to freedom and sacrifice, its inspirational lyrics also contain a comic undertone. “Marching through Georgia” is one of the best-known songs of the Civil War (1861-65). Composed by Henry Clay Work and published soon after the war ended in 1865, it commemorates Union general William T. Sherman’s march from Atlanta to Savannah in the fall of 1864. The song became very popular in the North and sold more than 500,000 copies in the first twelve years after its publication. (Source: www.georgiaencyclopedia.org)

 

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