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Lyre Leaved Sage

Lyre Leaved Sage

Lyre Leaved Sage

This is a blog about my personal experiences as a writer, mother and accountant. I love to write about the round abouts of my life, personal experiences, and financial matters and hope to inspire others with my words.Lyreleaf sage is a strictly upright, hairy perennial, 1-2 ft. tall with a rosette of leaves at the base. The leaves are deeply 3-lobed, with a few simple leaves higher up on the stem. Large basal leaves are purple-tinged in the winter. This species has the typical square stem and 2-lipped blossom of the mints. Its pale-blue to violet, tubular flowers are arranged in whorls around the stem forming an interrupted, terminal spike. Each blossom is about 1 inch long. The 2-lobed lower lip is much longer than the upper, which has 3 lobes, the middle one forming a sort of hood. The sepals are purplish-brown.

Sage

Salvia lyrata's native range is a large, southeastern swath of the United States: from Connecticut to Missouri, and south. Typical habitats include rocky woodlands, savannas, shorelines, and blufflands. Growing in USDA Zones 6-9, this hardy plant prefers full to partial sun and moist, gritty soil. Highly resilient, Lyre-leaved Sage will tolerate temporary drought, partial flooding, and even consistent mowing! It may require some help to compete amongst taller, more aggressive species, but once established, this plant will self-seed prolifically. Garden tips: Lyreleaf sage is highly adaptable to a variety of conditions and can tolerate both drought and flooding. It does well along roadsides and trail edges. In a landscape, it can be planted with grasses and other groundcovers, as it responds well to mowing. It is easily propagated by root division and seed; plants grown from seed can reach the flowering stage in only a few months. Lyreleaf sage is a prolific self-seeder and can spread quickly, but can be easily managed in a landscape by deadheading and removing seedlings.

Salvia Lyrata is a medicinal and edible herb. As alternative medicine, it is carminative, diaphoretic, laxative, and salve. Lyre-leaved sage has some of the same properties of the other sages but is very weak. It is used mainly as a gargle in the treatment of sore throat and mouth infections. Medicinal salve made from root is applied to sores. Warm infusion of herb is taken as a laxative or for colds, coughs and nervous debility. This sage is not very strong tasting, and has a rather pleasant minty flavor, fresh young leaves are edible in salads, or cooked as pot herb.Perennial native sage, common in dry woods, barrens, roadsides, lawns and waste places. Eastern N. America - Pennsylvania to Florida, west to Texas and Illinois. Cultivation: requires a very well-drained light sandy soil in a sunny position. Growing to about 16 to 24 inches in height with a square, slightly hairy, stem and produce whorls of blue or violet tubular flowers. The leaves form a basal rosette, are up to 8" long, and often have dark red or purple areas along the main veins, are irregularly cleft and some times lobed. Gather fresh young edible leaves in spring. Gather entire plant as flowers bloom, dry for later herb use. (Source:altnature.com)

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