FutureStarr

Lydia Jacoby

Lydia Jacoby

Lydia Jacoby

Lydiana Jacoby is a Seattle based entrepreneur with a passion for business growth. She specializes in marketing, sales, web design, brand development, SEO, blogging, content creation, and content management. When she’s not in front of a computer, she spends her time biking, camping, hiking, and exploring.

TIME

Jacoby first qualified for the U.S. Olympic Trials in late 2018 when she was 14 years old. This first qualification was in the 100-meter breaststroke. She swam her qualifying time at the USA Swimming Winter Nationals swim meet in Greensboro, North Carolina. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

In April 2021 Jacoby took second place in the finals of the 100-meter long course breaststroke at the TYR Pro Swim Series swim meet in Mission Viejo, California with a personal record time of 1:06.38. (Source: en.wikipedia.org On the morning on Friday June 4, 2021, Jacoby swam the 2nd fastest time in all prelims heats of the 15 & over girls 100-yard breaststroke qualifying for the finals in the evening of the same day with a time of 1:04.29. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

In the evening, Jacoby swam the fastest time in the 15 & over girls 100-yard breaststroke finals with a time of 58.87 seconds, swimming the first 50 yards in a time of 28.12 seconds and the second 50 yards in a time of 30.75 seconds. (Source: en.wikipedia.org In September, Jacoby was named to the 2021–2022 USA Swimming National Team in the 100 meter breaststroke based on her performances earlier in 2021, it was the first time she made the US National Team, which is open to all ages. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

The same day, NBC Sports previewed the women's swimming events for the USA Olympic Trials, highlighting swims by USA women from 2016 to the article's publishing date on June 10, 2021. Ordering best times swum during the 2021 year pre-Olympic Trials, Jacoby was NBC Sports's 2nd place designee for the women's 100-meter breaststroke event at the Olympic Trials. (Source: en.wikipedia.org Jacoby had a breakthrough in the short course 100 meter breaststroke race also at the World Cup stop in Berlin, swimming a time of 1:05.20, winning the bronze medal in the event, and ranking her as the 13th fastest female swimmer in the race in 2021 up to then. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

Her time of 59.66 seconds in the 100 yard breaststroke set a new Alaska state high school record in the event, marking the first time in the history of the state of Alaska that a female swimmer swum the 100 yard breaststroke in less than one minute at a high school state Championship competition, and her accomplishments at the Championship earned her the "Outstanding Female Swimmer" award. (Source: en.wikipedia.org As the competitions came her way, she only grew, and continued to clock faster and faster times. (Source:olympics.com))

Tokyo 2020 has been an Olympics full of upsets—but Osaka's time in the Games helped highlight athletes' mental health. (Source: www.glamour.com Ledecky booked her place in the final of the 200m freestyle with the third-fastest time of the heats, half-a-second slower than the quickest qualifier. Who was, you guessed it: Australia’s Ariarne Titmus, who beat Ledecky to win gold in the 400m freestyle a day earlier. That sets up another intriguing clash between two of the most familiar names at these Games. But today was about the shock of the new. (Source:www.theguardian.com))

While everyone knows her name now, she is not far removed from being a relative unknown. She had never competed in a major international event prior to the Olympics. When the U.S. Olympic Trials came around, she was seeded 15th overall in the event before eventually swimming a personal-best time of 1:05.28 to qualify for the team. (Source: www.sportingnews.com Those would not be her only high school state championships, as she added another one the following year, in July 2019, along with two Alaska Long Course Championships in the 100 and 200 breaststroke, according to SwimCloud. Later that summer, she took her talents to the national stage, where she won the Speedo Junior National Championship in the 100 breaststroke with a time of 1:08.12. That qualified her for the U.S. Junior National Team. (Source:www.sportingnews.com))

In the evening, Jacoby swam the fastest time in the 15 & over girls 100-yard breaststroke finals with a time of 58.87 seconds, swimming the first 50 yards in a time of 28.12 seconds and the second 50 yards in a time of 30.75 seconds. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

RECORD

Lydia Jacoby, who joined the team from Seward, Alaska, stunned the world when she surged late in the women's 100-meter breaststroke on Monday, beating teammate and reigning Olympic champion Lilly King (who also happens to hold the world record) and South African star Tatyana Schoenmaker for the gold medal in the race. She was already the first Alaskan swimmer to qualify for the Olympics, and now is the state's first Olympic gold medalist. (Source: www.sportingnews.com On a night where the U.S. watched several Olympic and world record-holders dive into the pool at the Tokyo Aquatics Center, it was a 17-year-old Alaskan who took away the spotlight. (Source:www.sportingnews.com))

Jacoby has been in the pool since she was 6 years old. She started competing for the Seward Tsunami Swim Club and, in a state that isn't particularly known for its swimming, took down her first state record at age 12, according to SwimSwam. Now she holds three long-course meter records — in the 50 breaststroke, 100 breaststroke and 200 breaststroke — and three short-course yard records in the same events, according to SwimCloud. (Source: www.sportingnews.com Jacoby has been in the pool since she was 6 years old. She started competing for the Seward Tsunami Swim Club and, in a state that isn't particularly known for its swimming, took down her first state record at age 12, according to SwimSwam. Now she holds three long-course meter records — in the 50 breaststroke, 100 breaststroke and 200 breaststroke — and three short-course yard records in the same events, according to SwimCloud. (Source:www.sportingnews.com))

 

Related Articles