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Lycopus Bugleweed

Lycopus Bugleweed

Lycopus Bugleweed

There are several Lycopus species in Minnesota, all with similar clusters of small, white, tubular flowers around the leaf axils, most growing in the same type of habitat at the same time, often next to each other. Northern Bugleweed is most easily distinguished by its short calyx, relative hairlessness, and coarsely toothed but unlobed leaves; it is easiest to separate from the others (especially L. asper) when fruits are present. American Water Horehound (Lycopus americanus) is distinguished by its deeply lobed lower leaves; Rough Bugleweed (Lycopus asper) by its hairy stem and calyx, the calyx lobes as long as the floral tube and much longer than the fruits; Virginia Bugleweed (Lycopus virginicus) by its broader, hairy leaves and lack of tubers. Wild Mint (Mentha arvensis) also has clusters of small flowers in the axils, but has usually pink to lavender flowers, and a strong mint scent when leaves are crushed. Lycopus species are not aromatic.

White

Small dense clusters of 1/8 to 1/6-inch white flowers surround leaf axils along much of the stem, blooming from the bottom of the plant up and usually not all flowers in a cluster open at the same time. Individual flowers are tubular, with 4 spreading lobes about equal in size. There may be a few tiny pinkish purple spots on the inside of the petals. 2 stamens about as long as the petals extend out of the tube. The calyx is hairy, about as long as the floral tube, and has 4 or 5 narrowly triangular lobes with sharply pointed tips.There are several Lycopus species in Minnesota, all with similar clusters of small, white, tubular flowers at the leaf axils, most growing in the same type of habitat at the same time, often next to each other. Rough Bugleweed is most easily distinguished by it slightly larger flowers (1/6 inch vs. 1/8 for the others), the calyx as long as the floral tube, some degree of hairiness, and its stalkless, coarsely toothed but unlobed leaves; it is easiest to separate from the others (especially L. uniflorus) when fruits are present. American Water Horehound (Lycopus americanus) is otherwise distinguished by its deeply lobed lower leaves; Northern Bugleweed (Lycopus uniflorus) by the short calyx lobes, not longer than the fruits; Virginia Bugleweed (Lycopus virginicus) by its broader, stalked leaves and short calyx lobes. Wild Mint (Mentha arvensis) also has clusters of small flowers in the axils, but has usually pink to lavender flowers, and a strong mint scent when leaves are crushed. Lycopus species are not aromatic.

Dense axillary whorls of white flowers occur where pairs of middle to upper leaves join the stem. Individual flowers are about 1/8" (2-3 mm.) in length. Each flower has a white short-tubular corolla with 4 spreading lobes, a light green calyx with 5 teeth, 2 exerted stamens, and a pistil. The calyx teeth are narrowly triangular and about twice as long as they are across. The corolla is only a little longer than the teeth of the calyx. The blooming period occurs from mid-summer to fall, lasting about 2 months. Neither the foliage nor the flowers have any noticeable fragrance. Afterwards, the flowers are replaced by nutlets in groups of Rough Bugleweed is native to nearly all of North America except the South East and the eastern seaboard. The leaves are opposite and can be four inches long. Some of the undersides of the leaves can be slightly hairy. Dense clusters of tubular white flowers bloom from the bottom of the plant, up. The flowers can be seen blooming out of the same place where the leaves branch off from the main stem. There might be some tiny purple spots at the mouth of the flower. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

Plant

A small dense cluster of 1/8-inch white flowers surrounding leaf axils along much of the plant; usually not all in a cluster are open at the same time. Individual flowers are tubular with 4 spreading lobes of approximately equal size, sometimes the upper lobe is 2-parted or merely notched. 2 purple-tipped stamens extend out of the tube. The calyx has 5 broadly triangular lobes, sharply pointed at the tips and shorter than the floral tube.

Small dense clusters of 1/8 to 1/6-inch white flowers surround leaf axils along much of the stem, blooming from the bottom of the plant up and usually not all flowers in a cluster open at the same time. Individual flowers are tubular, with 4 spreading lobes about equal in size. There may be a few tiny pinkish purple spots on the inside of the petals. 2 stamens about as long as the petals extend out of the tube. The calyx is hairy, about as long as the floral tube, and has 4 or 5 narrowly triangular lobes with sharply pointed tips. (Source: www.minnesotawildflowers.info)

 

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