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Lupine in a Pot

Lupine in a Pot

Lupine in a Pot

Thank you for your informative article. I recently bought a lupine at a garden shop in New England, and several days later another. The 2nd plant was in a marked down section, with yellowed, wilted leaves no flowers and broken stems in a disintegrating cardboard pot that was only partially keeping the root ball contained. I took a chance, hoping the flower would be the pretty deep purple of my first plant. The tight flower spike grew but remained tightly closed and white. Oh well, I thought, it was just a couple of dollars. It will be fine… I was pleased to see yesterday morning that the flower is indeed deep purple. I have them both in deep urns with morning and mid day sun. I thought it was my TLC, but know now they thrive in unattended locations. Thank you again for your website.

Lupine

2) Lupines don’t like to be transplanted or have their roots disturbed. When growing from seed, try biodegradable pots, like the ones made from peat, that can be planted with the seedlings inside, or try a tactic that my friend uses. She sows her lupine seeds in big, six- to eight-inch (15- to 20-cm) deep trays. When they’re ready to transplant, she scoops under the seedling to avoid disturbing the soil and plants them quickly in a hole that has been thoroughly soaked and has sand and/or gravel in the bottom. Which leads me to the next important tip….4) Lupines send out a long taproot, anchoring itself to where it’s planted. When a seed is started in a pot, the first thing it will do after sprouting is send a taproot out the drainage hole and form a knot, which you can’t disturb without potentially killing the plant. You can try starting seeds in deep trays with no drainage holes and lots of vermiculite and gravel to improve drainage around the roots, or try cutting the container off from the taproot before planting.

I planted several packets of Lupines this past Fall. In the late Spring only 8 of them sprouted, and I didn’t know about soaking or nicking the seeds before planting them. I’ve had one that survived but it only has leaves (lots of leaves!!). I’ve bought more seeds to try again next year. The owner of the nursery suggested that I put the seeds in the freezer until I plant / germinate them. When should I plant them inside to get them started? I live in IL and it’s cold and snowy until the end of April usually. Thank You for your feedback!!I bought 5 small lupines in our local nursery. They were in very small containers and the roots had gone round and round about the bottom of the plant. Before I planted them I removed the roots that were encircling the botton of the earth ball and then planted them. They looked fine for about 2 weeks and few beautifully. The weather in Israel was very mild in Oct and Nov. One of the plants suddenly died one day. The leaves just shriveled up. The others seemed fine. About 5 days later another one died. The remaining 3 plants look very good. Can you tell me why this happened? They have been planted in a large planter box with good drainage. and get full morning sun until about 1 p.m. (Source: gardenmaking.com)

 

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