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Los angeles skyscraper slide

Los angeles skyscraper slide

Los angeles skyscraper slide

The ground shook beneath spectators at a Los Angeles sports event when a chunk of concrete fell off the roof of a skyscraper. The episode was captured on video by a spectator. The incident occurred after a chunk of cement fell from the U.S. Bank Tower just before a Los Angeles Kings hockey game on Saturday. Authorities say the piece of concrete fell from the roof of the south wing. There are no reports of injuries from the incident.

BANK

Well, that was fun and mostly terrifying while it lasted. Skyslide, a pulse-quickening attraction at Downtown Los Angeles’s U.S. Bank Tower where guests forked over $8 (on top of a $25 observation deck admission fee) to careen down a glass-enclosed chute affixed to the side of the second-tallest skyscraper in L.A., will not reopen after being shuttered to the public just ahead of the coronavirus pandemic. The public observation deck, Skyspace, will also not reopen.Topping out at 73 stories, the glass crown-topped Postmodernist U.S. Bank Tower, also locally known as the Library Tower, was designed by Henry Cobb for Pei Cobb Freed & Partners. Opening in 1989, it cost $350 million to build. OUE’s ownership of the landmark skyscraper was relatively short-lived: the company acquired the tower in 2013 for $367.5 million and invested $31 million in renovations, including the Gensler-led creation of Skyspace and Skyslide. In July 2020, Silverstein Properties purchased the tower for $450 million in what the Commercial Observer described as “one of the biggest pandemic-driven steals of 2020.”

New U.S. Bank Tower owner Silverstein Properties is pumping $60 million into upgrades for the Downtown L.A. structure that’ll transition some of its glossy, international airport-like interiors into more of a boutique hotel look with wood surfaces and lots of leaves. As part of that, formerly tourist-facing spaces will now mostly be reserved for office tenants, while the all-glass, 1,000-feet-above-the-ground Skyslide will go away entirely. The construction of U.S. Bank Tower was perhaps the most high-profile achievement of Maguire Thomas Partners, a Los Angeles real estate development company that was one of the largest in the country in the 1980s and 1990s. Founder Robert F. Maguire III died Tuesday. The skyscraper was first called Library Tower and was known for a time as First Interstate World Center. (Source: www.latimes.com)

 

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