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Loosestrife synonym

Loosestrife synonym

Loosestrife synonym

Eurasian yellow loosestrife (Lysimachia vulgaris), an erect plant 0.6 to 1.2 metres (2 to 4 feet) high, is common on riverbanks in England and grows in eastern North America. The branched stem bears tapering leaves in pairs or whorls and terminal clusters of deep yellow flowers.

Loosestrife

A bumblebee visits an invasive purple loosestrife plant growing along the shoreline of Havre de Grace, Md., on July 25, 2016. Purple loosestrife is an invasive species from Europe and Asia that can invade freshwater wetlands and crowd out native plants that provide ideal habitat for a variety of waterfowl and other wetland animals. (Photo by Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program.Purple loosestrife spreads rapidly via seeds, roots and stem fragments. A single mature plant can produce more than 2 million seeds per year. Wind, water and animals spread the seeds, which grow into new seedlings the following spring. It can reproduce asexually when its thick, fleshy roots produce new shoots, allowing the plant to spread about one foot per year. New plants can also grow from stem fragments when plants are cut or mowed down.

Purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) is usually found in wetlands, marshes, river and stream sides, roadside ditches, culverts, and lake and pond shores. However, loosestrife can also grow in drier soils such as those of meadows, pastureland, and home gardens. In Vermont, purple loosestrife has the highest densities in Essex county but can also be found in Chittenden, Addison, Washington, and Windsor counties. Purple loosestrife is hardy and can be planted in autumn or spring, or in mild spells during winter. If planting in the shallow water at the edge of a pond or stream, plant into an aquatic planting container (a mesh basket) makes pond management easier in future when it becomes necessary to restrict or divide plants. For planting in ponds, use aquatic planting compost or sieved garden soil that hasn’t been fertilized, otherwise the nutrients would encourage the growth of green algae in pond water. (Source: www.gardenersworld.com)

 

 

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