FutureStarr

Liatris Bracteata

Liatris Bracteata

Liatris Bracteata

Liatris bracteata grows from rounded corms that produce hairless, 25 to 75 cm (9.8 to 29.5 in) tall stems. The flowers are in loose heads that are widely spaced from each other on the stem. The heads have no stems (sessile) and are arranged in a spike-like collection. The foliage is dotted with glands and the basal and cauline leaves have one nerve and are linear in shape.Nesom, Guy L. (2006). "Liatris bracteata". In Flora of North America Editorial Committee (ed.). Flora of North America North of Mexico (FNA). Vol. 21. New York and Oxford – via eFloras.org, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO & Harvard University Herbaria, Cambridge, MA.

Liatris

Powderhorn Ranch in Calhoun County will become a state park and wildlife management area open to the public in a few years. During a recent biological survey of the tract, Baylor University’s Walter Holmes and Jeff Mink and I were pleased to encounter a large population of bracted blazing star (Liatris bracteata) sure to delight those future visitors.Plants 25–75 cm. Corms globose. Stems glabrous. Leaves: basal and proximal cauline 1-nerved, linear, 40–100 × 1–2 mm, even-sized or gradually reduced distally, essentially glabrous, gland-dotted (proximal margins sparsely ciliate). Heads (widely spaced, stems evident) in loose, spiciform arrays. Peduncles 0. Involucres turbinate-cylindric, (11–)12–15 × 5–7 mm. Phyllaries in 5–6(–7) series, broadly oblong to lanceolate-oblong, strongly unequal, glabrous, margins without hyaline borders, finely ciliolate, apices obtuse, rounded, or truncate, sharply involute-apiculate. Florets 8–14(–16); corolla tubes glabrous inside. Cypselae 6–9 mm; pappi: lengths ± equaling corollas, bristles plumose. 2n = 60.

TPWD’s Wildlife Diversity Program works with Texans to conserve rare plant and animal species and areas with high conservation value. We’d like to learn more about populations of bracted blazing star, especially those not yet documented. Together, we can work toward conserving this rare native wildflower that vividly illuminates coastal prairies each fall.Plants 25–75 cm. Corms globose. Stems glabrous. Leaves: basal and proximal cauline 1-nerved, linear, 40–100 × 1–2 mm, even-sized or gradually reduced distally, essentially glabrous, gland-dotted (proximal margins sparsely ciliate). Heads (widely spaced, stems evident) in loose, spiciform arrays. Peduncles 0. Involucres turbinate-cylindric, (11–)12–15 × 5–7 mm. Phyllaries in 5–6(–7) series, broadly oblong to lanceolate-oblong, strongly unequal, glabrous, margins without hyaline borders, finely ciliolate, apices obtuse, rounded, or truncate, sharply involute-apiculate. Florets 8–14(–16); corolla tubes glabrous inside. Cypselae 6–9 mm; pappi: lengths ± equaling corollas, bristles plumose. 2n = 60. (Source: www.efloras.org)

 

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