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Landscaping Native Plants Iowa

Landscaping Native Plants Iowa

Landscaping Native Plants Iowa

This plant is a much tamer, non-invasive version of ordinary Ditch Goldenrod. The blooms are large with a bright, sunny yellow color, born on very sturdy stems that grow up to three feet tall. It has large flowers bloom later in summer and fall, adding that perfect pop of color to any Iowa garden. Bees and other pollinators are also very attracted to this plant.Native landscaping features native plants and grasses with deep root systems, which create open space in the soil below and allow rainfall to percolate deep into the ground. Native plants are adapted to Iowa’s climate and tolerant of weather extremes. They create diverse habitat that attract birds, butterflies, and other wildlife. Most importantly, once established, they don’t require fertilizer, pesticides, and supplemental water to survive.

Iowa

If plants native to Iowa are strategically placed, it will enhance the landscape’s ability to infiltrate and manage stormwater. Many of the other infiltration-based stormwater management practices use native plants to add functionality and beauty while being low maintenance. Native plants can replace large expanses of turf grass in parks, yards, and corporate campuses. After establishment, native landscaping is less expensive to maintain than mowed turf grass areas.Native plants are plants that grew naturally in the pre-settlement tall grass prairies of Iowa. Tallgrass prairie developed in Iowa more than 10,000 years ago, after the retreat of glaciers. This ecosystem included grasses, flowering plants, insects, and other animals adapted to survive a wide range of conditions ranging from hot and dry to moist and boggy. Nearly all of the tallgrass prairie disappeared because of the growth of agricultural production.

Next on our list is the sweet flag. Another perennial that grows about 1-3 ½ feet tall, this low-maintenance plant is another good choice for your Iowa native garden. It has tufts of basal leaves that put off a nice, sweet smell, lending to its common name. Sometimes it is also called muskrat root. This flowering plant has psychoactive chemicals and was long ago used in natural medicine. Our Iowa native plants list is meant to get you started on the right track but if you want to learn more, or ask questions about your specific lawn or garden, getting the help of a professional from a local nursery might be a good place to start. They will have the best knowledge about what is available to you and how to make the best of the natural conditions in your landscape. Let’s explore this a bit more. (Source: www.backyardgardenlover.com)

 

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