FutureStarr

Lanceleaf coreopsis care

Lanceleaf coreopsis care

Lanceleaf coreopsis care

This native species has branching stems at base and often forms sizable colonies along roadsides and in old fields. A southern species, Greater Tickseed (C. major), 2-3' (60-90 cm) tall, has sunflower-like flower heads 1-2" (2.5-5 cm) wide and opposite leaves deeply segmented into 3 parts, appearing as a whorl of 6. Nearly a dozen other perennial yellow-flowered Coreopsis species occur in the East.

Coreopsis

Conditions Comments: Lance-leaved coreopsis is the most common coreopsis and is easy to grow. It is drought tolerant but is not a reliably perennial. However it self-sows readily and can become weedy. The showy golden flowers are nice in a vase and are a popular plant for visiting pollinators. It should have frequent deadheading to keep it in bloom well into the summer.A member of the Asteraceae family, Coreopsis lanceolata is native to most of the United States, parts of Canada, and Mexico. It grows from multiple erect stems and has opposite, sessile, linear oblong leaves that are found mostly in the bottom half of the plant. Both ray and disk flowers are present with the ray flowers having four lobes at the tips. The big flowers and undivided deeply cut leaves with an opposite arrangement make this any easy wildflower to identify in the field. It is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 3-8 and typically blooms from April through July.

Lance-leaf Coreopsis waves brightly in late spring and early summer on sunny, even hot sites with dry, sandy or poor soil. The bright yellow, daisy-like flowers are about 1 1/2" in diameter and bloom singly on long stems. Promptly dead-head spent blossoms to prolong the bloom period. The ray petals have four deep lobes on their margins. This species also is commonly called Sand Coreopsis, or Tickseed because many think the seed looks like Ticks.Lanceleaf Coreopsis is native from the Great Lakes south to the Gulf of Mexico, but the western edge of its range ends at the Wisconsin/Minnesota border. It is widely available in the nursery trade and is sometimes included in restoration plantings. It is recognized by leaves all on the lower half of the stem, most leaves lacking any lobes; all-yellow flowers 2 to 3 inches across, the rays toothed or shallowly lobed at the tips; black seeds with brown, papery wings. (Source: www.minnesotawildflowers.info)

 

Related Articles