FutureStarr

Justin Chon

Justin Chon

Justin Chon

Justin Chon

The actor Justin Chon shares his memories of his childhood, his discovery of his passion for acting, and how he overcame his struggles. Through some of his most memorable roles, Justin turns the most painful scenarios into something positive. He describes these as his life lessons.

Film

In 2014, Chon appeared as a lead character in crime drama film Revenge of the Green Dragons, which was executive produced by Martin Scorsese. In 2015, Chon starred as Sid Park, the trouble-making main character influenced by rocker culture in the independent film Seoul Searching, directed by Benson Lee, which made its premiere at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival.

A Korean-American actor, Justin Chon is best known for his supporting role in the "Twilight" film franchise. His father appeared in South Korean films as a youth and inspired Justin to follow a career in acting. After winning his earliest minor screen roles while in his early 20s, Chon quickly ascended to more significant parts, notably playing the brother of the title character in the hit Disney Channel movie "Wendy Wu: Homecoming Warrior" (2006). Soon thereafter, he scored a recurring role on the sitcom "Just Jordan" (Nickelodeon, 2007-08) and found a much wider fan base when he was cast in the part of high school student Eric Yorkie in the blockbuster supernatural drama "Twilight" (2008), based on Stephenie Meyer's young-adult book of the same name. After appearing in subsequent installments of the hugely popular series, Chon finally landed a lead role in the raucous coming-of-age comedy "21 & Over" (2013). With his likable, laidback charm, Chon was able to alternate easily between dramas and comedies and win parts that weren't contingent on his Asian-American background. (Source: www.rottentomatoes.com)

New

Gook had to be in LA because it's about the LA riots. Ms. Purple also had to be in LA because it's about people getting left behind in a gentrifying Koreatown. It was important that I put [Blue Bayou] in New Orleans because I always knew I wanted a Vietnamese storyline, and I wanted to get to adjacent Asian cultures in one film. There's a huge Vietnamese population in Louisiana, because a lot of them were relocated there and were refugees after the Vietnam War. I always knew I wanted that character because she's a reflection of Antonio's subconscious. She also makes him introspective about where he came from and where he might go through an adjacent Asian culture. I really thought that was an important aspect for me: you talk about your own identity through not your exact identity but something that feels like it could be.

Chon’s latest feature, Blue Bayou, tells the story of Antonio LeBlanc, a Korean American adoptee who runs afoul of the law and faces deportation to a birth country he only dimly remembers. Blue Bayou is a stirring melodrama grounded in precisely observed naturalism — the cast, led by Chon as Antonio and Alicia Vikander as Antonio’s wife Kathy, is uniformly excellent, and the working-class New Orleans setting shimmers with light and heat. The movie premiered in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard section in July, and Focus Features releases it in the U.S. tomorrow, September 17. (Source: filmmakermagazine.com

 

 

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