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Jerry clower

Jerry clower

jerry clower

This is a story of a life well lived—a life that has been exceptional throughout every stage of its course. “I’ve done a lot of things in my life,” says Jerry Clower, “and the love affair among the people before me and after me is an overwhelming and remarkable thing”.

jerry clower

), memorial page for Jerry Clower (28 Sep 1926–24 Aug 1998), Find a Grave Memorial ID 3573, citing East Fork Cemetery, East Fork, Amite County, Mississippi, USA ; Maintained by Find a Grave .

Jerry Clower was born in Liberty, Mississippi, and began a two-year stint in the Navy immediately after graduating from high school in 1944. Upon his discharge, in 1946, he was a Radioman Third Class (RMN3) and had earned the American Campaign Medal, the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal (with two bronze service stars), and the World War II Victory Medal. (Source: military.wikia.org)

At first, Clower took orders at his speaking engagements, selling 8000 copies on the Lemon record label. In time, Wilkes sent a copy to Grant Turner at WSM radio in Nashville, and when Turner played it on the air, Clower said "that thing busted loose". MCA was soon knocking on Clower's door, offering him a contract. Once MCA began distribution in 1971, Jerry Clower from Yazoo City, Mississippi Talkin’ retailed more than a million dollars over 10 months and stayed in the top 20 on the country charts for 30 weeks. (Source: military.wikia.org)

↑ Jerry Clower profile, olemiss.edu; accessed August 31, 2014. (Source: military.wikia.org)

↑ Jerry Clower profile, cmt.com; accessed August 31, 2014. (Source: military.wikia.org)

↑ Jerry Clower profile, findagrave.com; accessed August 31, 2014. (Source: military.wikia.org)

↑ Jerry Clower awards, allmusic.com; accessed August 31, 2014. (Source: military.wikia.org)

↑ "American album certifications – Jerry Clower – Jerry Clower". Recording Industry Association of America. http://www.riaa.com/gold-platinum/?tab_active=default-award&ar=Jerry+Clower&ti=Jerry+Clower#search_section. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH (Source: military.wikia.org)

One of the most highly acclaimed country comedians and a member of the Grand Ole Opry from 1973 until his death in 1998, recording artist, writer, and “racoonteur” Jerry Clower could be heard spinning tales for the public about his Mississippi roots for more than a quarter of a century. (Source: mwp.olemiss.edu)

In the foreword to Stories from Home, fellow Mississippi writer Willie Morris wrote that Clower’s comic art demonstrates the richness of the spoken language of the South “in all its inwardness and nuance and sweep — the extravagant country talk, as lyrical as much of southern literature, and in the lineal ancestry of southern writing.” He concludes that Jerry Clower’s humor is “rooted in a region, but is not regional.” Laughter is the force that connects people from all regions in his work of art. (Source: mwp.olemiss.edu)

Jerry Clower's clean, country humor gets proper representation on this well-assembled Greatest Hits, a collection that, since its release in 1994, has launched many a hunting season with some down home laughs. All of Clower's most colorful characters are here, including Uncle Versie (the king of bird huntin') Marcel Ledbetter (the king of schemes), and Claude Ledbetter (the king of catching fish). These hilarious, slowly winding stories of growing up in Mississippi are the Southern counterparts to Bill Cosby's stories of growing up in the city, and just like Bill's work, Jerry's work is best experienced in its original form. Check Clower's early releases to hear these bits in the best context, but to be bitten by the bug, check Greatest Hits. You'll soon know why he's been dubbed "The Mouth of the Mighty Mississip'." (Source: www.barnesandnoble.com)

After Japan attacked the US Navy Base at Pearl Harbor in December of 1941, thousands of American teenagers volunteered to go and fight. In this episode, humorist Jerry Clower of Liberty, Mississippi, explains how growing up on a farm prepared him for life in the Navy. Raised in the rural South, Clower’s perceptions of race were limited to Black or White. He recalls an incident in basic training that opened his eyes to a wider world of ethnicity and prejudice. (caution: uses a racist word that he had never heard prior to joining up.) (Source: mississippimoments.org)

This book was most definitely a belly full of laughs!! I grew up listening to Jerry Clower on the radio and tv, so I was very interested in reading about him. It was so thrilling to "hear" the stories that he was telling about his childhood, his early years working and when he first met his wife. I was amazed to learn that the Ledbetter's really are "real" as are so many of the other people that he tells about in his stories. I believe what makes Jerry Clower such a fun person to hear and read a This book was most definitely a belly full of laughs!! I grew up listening to Jerry Clower on the radio and tv, so I was very interested in reading about him. It was so thrilling to "hear" the stories that he was telling about his childhood, his early years working and when he first met his wife. I was amazed to learn that the Ledbetter's really are "real" as are so many of the other people that he tells about in his stories. I believe what makes Jerry Clower such a fun person to hear and read about is his honesty and love for all people. He lets his love and compassion show forth in all that he does. I would truly recommend this book to any and all ages. It's most definitely one that I would read again and again. I laughed out loud so many times. I would rate it higher that a 5 if I could!! Loved it!! ...more (Source: www.goodreads.com)

by Jerry Clower (Rutledge Hill Press 1987)(Biography) is a collection of Jayree's jokes and stories on all things southern. My rating: 6.5/10, finished 6/25/12. ...more (Source: www.goodreads.com)

Jerry Clower (1926-1998) was Mississippi's most beloved comedian. He produced over twenty-seven comedy recordings during his lifetime, all of which chronicled rural southern life in the twentieth century. He frequently appeared as a member on The Grand Ole Opry and hosted his own radio show, Country Crossroads. (Source: www.ubcpress.ca)

Story

Stories from Home. Foreword by Willie Morris. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1992.

Stories Told Funny, MCA, 1993. (Source: mwp.olemiss.edu)

Jerry Clower's clean, country humor gets proper representation on this well-assembled Greatest Hits, a collection that, since its release in 1994, has launched many a hunting season with some down home laughs. All of Clower's most colorful characters are here, including Uncle Versie (the king of bird huntin') Marcel Ledbetter (the king of schemes), and Claude Ledbetter (the king of catching fish). These hilarious, slowly winding stories of growing up in Mississippi are the Southern counterparts to Bill Cosby's stories of growing up in the city, and just like Bill's work, Jerry's work is best experienced in its original form. Check Clower's early releases to hear these bits in the best context, but to be bitten by the bug, check Greatest Hits. You'll soon know why he's been dubbed "The Mouth of the Mighty Mississip'." (Source: www.barnesandnoble.com)

Located @ 1 Amazing Grace Lane, in the East Fork community, approximately 8 miles east of Liberty, 10 miles west of I-55, ¼ mile off MS Hwy. 24 East. The museum features memorabilia that highlights the career of Howard Gerald “Jerry” Clower, a popular country comedian best known for his stories of the rural south. A member of the Grand Ole Opry since 1973, he made 27 full length recordings in his 27 year professional entertainment career. As a Christian, Jerry took every opportunity to share his faith with others, including his recording, “Ain’t God Cood”, which gave him an opportunity to present his personal testimony. For more information and an appointment of visit the museum, contact Mrs. Homerline Clower @ (601) 249-3453. (Source: www.amitecounty.ms)

After fifty years, we've heard it all. From the horrors of war to the struggle for civil rights, Mississippians have shared their stories with us. The writers, the soldiers, the activists, the musicians, the politicians, the comedians, the teachers, the farmers, the sharecroppers, the survivors, the winners, the losers, the haves, and the have-nots. They've all entrusted us with their memories, by the thousands. You like stories? We've got stories. After fifty years, we've heard it all. (Source: mississippimoments.org)

This book was most definitely a belly full of laughs!! I grew up listening to Jerry Clower on the radio and tv, so I was very interested in reading about him. It was so thrilling to "hear" the stories that he was telling about his childhood, his early years working and when he first met his wife. I was amazed to learn that the Ledbetter's really are "real" as are so many of the other people that he tells about in his stories. I believe what makes Jerry Clower such a fun person to hear and read a This book was most definitely a belly full of laughs!! I grew up listening to Jerry Clower on the radio and tv, so I was very interested in reading about him. It was so thrilling to "hear" the stories that he was telling about his childhood, his early years working and when he first met his wife. I was amazed to learn that the Ledbetter's really are "real" as are so many of the other people that he tells about in his stories. I believe what makes Jerry Clower such a fun person to hear and read about is his honesty and love for all people. He lets his love and compassion show forth in all that he does. I would truly recommend this book to any and all ages. It's most definitely one that I would read again and again. I laughed out loud so many times. I would rate it higher that a 5 if I could!! Loved it!! ...more (Source: www.goodreads.com)

by Jerry Clower (Rutledge Hill Press 1987)(Biography) is a collection of Jayree's jokes and stories on all things southern. My rating: 6.5/10, finished 6/25/12. ...more (Source: www.goodreads.com)

I seem to recall a version of the football story, or maybe it was another, where he talked about how good a running back was, and said in effect "I saw him comin. I got ready, and I stuck him. (Source: www.tidefans.com)

That story was about Auburn's Travis Tidwell. Here's a link to an old SI article that contains a part of that story: (Source: www.tidefans.com)

The 71 year old entertainer, perhaps best known for his bright red suits, hilarious Baptist-belted humor and stories of Yazoo City lore, was hospitalized only a few days earlier for bypass surgery. (Source: www.cmt.com)

 

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