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Jane c ginsburg

Jane c ginsburg

Jane c ginsburg

Jane c ginsburg

In 1903 Jane C. Ginsburg launched a lawsuit against a millinery company. One lawsuit later, a new law was passed- women could now own their own businesses. Jane Ginsburg went on to become a pioneer in the field of womens’ rights- fighting for female emancipation, voting rights, and the right to own property.

GINSBURG

The faculty director of Columbia’s Kernochan Center for Law, Media, and the Arts, Jane Ginsburg is a renowned authority on intellectual property law and a staunch defender of authors’ rights. She teaches and writes about copyright law, international copyright law, legal methods, and trademark law; she is the author or co-author of casebooks on all four subjects including International Copyright: U.S. and EU Perspectives (with Edouard Treppoz) and Copyright: Cases and Materials (9th edition) (with Robert A. Gorman and R. Anthony Reese). Ginsburg was a co-reporter for the American Law Institute’s Principles of the Law, Intellectual Property: Principles Governing Jurisdiction, Choice of Law, and Judgments in Transnational Disputes. (Source: www.law.columbia.edu)

Fluent in French and Italian, Ginsburg has been a visiting professor at law schools and universities in France and Italy as well as in Australia, England, Israel, and New Zealand. She is a vice president of the Association Littéraire et Artistique Internationale, a Paris-based international organization created to promote and defend authors’ rights, and president of its U.S. chapter. She is an elected member of the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. (Source: www.law.columbia.edu)

New York, May 3, 2013—Columbia Law School Professor Jane C. Ginsburg, a leading scholar on intellectual property law, comparative law, private international law, and legal methods, was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society (APS) at the organization’s annual spring meeting. (Source: www.law.columbia.edu Ginsburg is a Leading Intellectual Property Scholar and Advocate for Author's Rights (Source:www.law.columbia.edu))

Ginsburg, the Morton L. Janklow Professor of Literary and Artistic Property Law, was elected to the social sciences class. She is Faculty Director of the Law School’s Kernochan Center for Law, Media and the Arts, which contributes to a broader understanding of the legal aspects of creative works of authorship, including their dissemination and use. (Source: www.law.columbia.edu New York, May 3, 2013—Columbia Law School Professor Jane C. Ginsburg, a leading scholar on intellectual property law, comparative law, private international law, and legal methods, was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society (APS) at the organization’s annual spring meeting. (Source:www.law.columbia.edu))

In addition to her role as a professor, Ginsburg has published many works, including three casebooks and numerous articles on domestic and international copyright law. She is also a vice president of the Association Littéraire et Artistique Internationale, a Paris-based international organization created to promote and defend authors’ rights, and president of that organization’s U.S. chapter. (Source: www.law.columbia.edu Fluent in French and Italian, Ginsburg has been a visiting professor or fellow at a number of distinguished educational institutions, including the University of Paris, the University of Cambridge, the University of Auckland, Hebrew University, and the University of Melbourne. (Source:www.law.columbia.edu))

According to APS, her membership creates what may be the first mother-daughter membership in the group’s history. Jane Ginsburg’s mother, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ’59, was elected a member in 2006. (Source: www.law.columbia.edu)

An expert on copyright, Ginsburg has written various treatises and law review articles. She received her B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Chicago, her J.D. degree from Harvard Law School, a DEA with a Fulbright grant (1985), and a Doctor of Law degree (1995) from Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas University. At Harvard, she served as an editor of the Harvard Law Review. (Source: en.wikipedia.org Jane Carol Ginsburg FBA (born July 21, 1955) is an American attorney. She is the Morton L. Janklow Professor of Literary and Artistic Property Law at the Columbia Law School. She also directs the law school's Kernochan Center for Law, Media and the Arts. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

She is the daughter of United States Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and law professor Martin Ginsburg, both of whom formerly served on the Columbia Law School faculty. Justice Ginsburg and Jane are the first mother–daughter pair ever to serve on the same law faculty in the United States. (Source: en.wikipedia.org Ginsburg was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2013. (Source:en.wikipedia.org))

Home » Research » Berkeley Center For Law & Technology » Events Archive, 2002-2021 » 2014 Events » April 2014 The Next Great Copyright Act » Speakers » Jane C. Ginsburg (Source: www.law.berkeley.edu Harris, Gardiner (June 27, 2010). "M.D. Ginsburg, 78, Dies; Lawyer and Tax Expert". The New York Times. Retrieved June 28, 2010. (Source:en.wikipedia.org uJane C. Ginsburg is the Morton L. Janklow Professor of Literary and Artistic Property Law at Columbia Law School, and faculty director of its Kernochan Center for Law, Media and the Arts. (Source:clouvain.be)))

With Professor Robert A. Gorman, she is the co-author of Copyright: Concepts and Insights, Foundation Press, 2012; with Professor Sam Ricketson, of International Copyright and Neighbouring Rights: The Berne Convention and Beyond, Oxford University Press, 2006; and with Professor Rochelle Dreyfuss and Professor François Dessemontet, Ginsburg was a co-reporter for the American Law Institute project on “Intellectual Property: Principles Governing Jurisdiction,” Choice of Law and Judgments in Transnational Disputes, 2008. (Source: uclouvain.be)

A graduate of the University of Chicago (B.A. in 1976 and a M.A. in 1977), Ginsburg received a J.D. in 1980 from Harvard University. As a Fulbright grantee, she also earned a Diplôme d'études approfondies in 1985, and a Doctorate of Law in 1995 from the University of Paris II. She is a corresponding fellow of the British Academy, a member of the American Philosophical Society, a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and a honorary fellow of Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge. (Source: uclouvain.be)

It was the only case the couple worked together, and it encapsulated, Stiepleman thought, so much about the era and their marriage: the discrimination that women faced; the path his aunt blazed, as she won cases to counter that discrimination even before she became a Supreme Court justice; and the unusually equal partnership she had with Martin Ginsburg, in the courtroom and at home. (Source: www.nytimes.com Daniel Stiepleman was sitting at his Uncle Martin’s funeral in 2010, when he heard a eulogy that sparked a screenplay. The story had to do with a case that his uncle, a tax lawyer, tried with his wife, who happened to be Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (Source:www.nytimes.com))

She opened her files in the Library of Congress to her nephew, who found inspiration in the snarky comments she made in the margins of briefs. She reviewed several drafts of the script, as did her daughter, Jane C. Ginsburg, whose childhood and teenage years are depicted onscreen. Jane’s son, Paul Spera, an actor, has a small part. And Stiepleman, whose mother, Claire, and Martin Ginsburg were siblings, is also an executive producer, “which basically means I’m the Ruth-whisperer,” he said. (Source: www.nytimes.com In the seven years between that call and the new film, “On the Basis of Sex,” the production became another point of connection for the extended Ginsburg clan. Even for a biopic, this one is unusually family-oriented: It traces Justice Ginsburg’s extraordinary relationships as much as her unparalleled career. (Source:www.nytimes.com))

Having so many family members participate, and the approval of the justice herself — she even makes a cameo — gave the movie an air of indispensable authenticity, said Mimi Leder, the director. Ginsburg reviewed the script as if it were a contract. “Like any good lawyer, she doesn’t leave any detail untrammeled,” said Felicity Jones, who plays her. (Source: www.nytimes.com Their closeness, which blossomed during filmmaking, was imperative. “There wasn’t going to be a movie, at least not by him, if my mother wasn’t comfortable with it,” Jane Ginsburg said. (Source:www.nytimes.com))

He was tall, fair-haired in his youth with a chiseled jawline, a charismatic storyteller who never missed a punch line. Armie Hammer fit the bill. When the stars went to Justice Ginsburg’s chambers to meet her, “she couldn’t take her eyes off Armie,” Jones said. (Source: www.nytimes.com)

To get her portrayal right, Jones, the British actress and star of “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” studied audiotapes from Ginsburg’s early lawsuits, divining that her Brooklyn accent became more pronounced as she grew more impassioned. They spent time together at the justice’s home, where, Jones said, “she very proudly showed me her incredibly tidy desk,” which is near her bed. (She still keeps a night owl’s working hours, with phone meetings about the script starting at 11 p.m., after she’d finished her typically long day at court.) (Source: www.nytimes.com)

If she didn’t seek out the biopic, she seemed to appreciate it. “The film is part fact, part imaginative,” she said that night. “But what’s wonderful about it is that the imaginative parts fit in with the story so well.” (In lieu of interviews, Ginsburg participated in several Q. and A.s.) (Source: www.nytimes.com The mid-December event was held before Ginsburg had surgery to remove cancerous nodules from her lungs. But her health was still a fresh concern, since she broke three ribs last month. In a conversation with the NPR correspondent Nina Totenberg, she assured the crowd she was feeling “better each week” and was back to her regular, strenuous workouts with her trainer. “Even planks,” she said. (Source:www.nytimes.com))

www.nytimes.com)Some of the legal groundwork may be familiar, thanks to the wildly popular documentary “RBG,” released in May. (Among her many firsts, Ginsburg is the only sitting Supreme Court justice to be the subject of two films in the same year.) But the revelation of the feature is in its focus on her home life: her terrible cooking, devoted mothering and spats with the teenage Jane, as well as the way in which Martin Ginsburg stepped up as parent and household co-leader. (Source:

For the Ginsburg family, seeing their life recreated onscreen, detailed down to the jewelry Ruth Bader Ginsburg wore when she argued before the Supreme Court, was surreal, “a step out of reality,” Jane Ginsburg said. (Source: www.nytimes.com The justice’s nephew, the screenwriter Daniel Stiepleman, left, and her daughter, Jane C. Ginsburg, who said, “There wasn’t going to be a movie, at least not by him, if my mother wasn’t comfortable with it.”Credit...Vincent Tullo for The New York Times (Source:www.nytimes.com wArmie Hammer, Cailee Spaeny (center) and Felicity Jones in “On the Basis of Sex,” an origin story about Justice Ginsburg.Credit...Jonathan Wenk/Focus Features (Source:ww.nytimes.com)))

The future justice was a stickler when her daughter was growing up, though. A skilled editor, “she made me rewrite every English paper multiple times,” Jane Ginsburg recalled. “That kind of paid off the other way round, when she would give me the drafts of her briefs, and I got to read them and make editing suggestions.” A Harvard Law graduate, Jane Ginsburg is now a professor of literary and artistic property law at Columbia University. (Her brother, James, runs a classical music label in Chicago. Clara Spera, another Harvard Law alumna, is a federal law clerk in New York.) (Source: www.nytimes.com To anyone who was around the Ginsburgs, their unusual parity was obvious. But to financiers and development executives, the character of Martin Ginsburg as a supportive husband was far-fetched. Backers offered to fund the film if he was rewritten as angrier, or less understanding; maybe he should threaten to divorce his wife, if she didn’t drop the case. (Source:www.nytimes.com))

Representing that dynamic may be one reason Justice Ginsburg gave the film her greenlight. “My mother strongly believes there won’t be true equality until men take full participation in child care and other household tasks,” her daughter said. The justice’s chambers are decorated with photos of her son-in-law gazing at his infant son, and now her grandson gazing at her great-granddaughter. (Source: www.nytimes.com)

 

 

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