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Indigo wilder

Indigo wilder

Indigo wilder

The Kansas City, Mo.-based business manufactures and distributes natural bath, skin, home and cleaning products. It is best known for the Zum product line, which includes the best-selling Zum Bar goat’s milk soap, $5.95. Indigo Wild’s body care lineup includes things like a Frankincense & Myrrh Zum Wash, $13.50, and Zum Lab Shampoo Bar, $6.25. The brand’s cleaning lineup includes Sea Salt Zum Clean Laundry Soap, $24.95, and Zum Glow Soy Candles, $15.50.

Wild

Founded in 1996 by Emily Voth, Indigo Wild has a natural-ingredient focus that includes things like organic olive and castor oils, and excludes things like synthetic foaming agents, parabens and phthalates. The company sells its products online through its Web site and the organic food channel, including Whole Foods. Industry sources said the brand has between $30 million and $40 million in sales.For HKW, the Indigo Wild investment not only provides access to the fast-growing beauty space, but gives the firm a foothold in the natural category, which has grown as consumer interest in overall wellness has expanded. Terms of the deal were not disclosed. Investment bank Moelis advised Indigo Wild on the transaction.

Background – The crew at Indigo Wild is a conglomeration of delightfully wacky plant lovers with a passion for natural bliss and soul-tingling good vibes. The company offers natural, plant-based, handcrafted bath, skin and home care products featuring pure essential oils under the Zum brand. All products are made in the US and are cruelty-free, vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free. The company is best known to many for its signature Zum Bar soaps.Growing your own plants from seed is the most economical way to add natives to your home. Before you get started, one of the most important things to know about the seeds of wild plants is that many have built-in dormancy mechanisms that prevent the seed from germinating. In nature, this prevents a population of plants from germinating all at once, before killing frosts, or in times of drought. To propagate native plants, a gardener must break this dormancy before seed will grow. (Source: www.prairiemoon.com)

 

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