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I have a dream speech

I have a dream speech

I have a dream speech

I have a dream that one day kids won’t be judged by their race, their sexual identity, their ethnicity, their extra-curricular activities, or their socioeconomic status. That they are called kids, not urban youth, or “youth of color”, or whatever politically-charged term we need to use to feel better at night.I Have A Dream' Speech, In Its Entirety Americans across the U.S. are celebrating Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy with a day of service. We reflect on his life and message by revisiting his celebrated I Have a Dream speech in its entirety.

Dream

Today, we celebrate the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. As millions of Americans honor his legacy today with a national day of service, we take a moment to reflect on Dr. King's life and message with his own words. As we did last year on the eve of a historic presidential inauguration, we now revisit King's celebrated "I Have a Dream" speech, delivered on August 28, 1963 on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.Dr. KING: I have a dream that one day down in Alabama with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, one day right down in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today.(Source:ww.npr.org)

King

Dr. KING: I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our Northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

Dr. KING: So even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal. On August 28, 1963, some 100 years after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation freeing the slaves, a young man named Martin Luther King climbed the marble steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. to describe his vision of America. More than 200,000 people-black and white-came to listen. They came by plane, by car, by bus, by train, and by foot. They came to Washington to demand equal rights for black people. And the dream that they heard on the steps of the Monument became the dream of a generation. (Source: kr.usembassy.gov)

 

 

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