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Hypericum

Hypericum

Hypericum

A Google Scholar structured search using different keywords was conducted in order to find relevant studies (last search run on March 2016). No limits were applied for language and foreign papers were translated. We used the following search terms: “hypericum”, “animal”, and one of the following: “nootropic”, “cognitive enhancing”, “cognitive enhancers”, “memory enhancing”, or “memory enhancement”. We also included all relevant studies referred to by a previous comprehensive review

Hypericum

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A Google Scholar structured search using different keywords was conducted in order to find relevant studies (last search run on March 2016). No limits were applied for language and foreign papers were translated. The irreversible effects of modern therapies and increasing drug resistance have augmented our reliance on medicinal plants for herbal remedy against the deadly and infectious diseases. Hypericum perforatum or St. John’s wort (SJW) family Clusiaceae has been used to treat depression, mental disorders, wounds, peptic ulcers, malaria, gout and arthritis. Various compounds of the plant are known as sedative, diuretic and expectorant according to their effects.It is also used in the treatment of pulmonary complaints.

Its use in wound healing could be justified with its anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and astringent effects. It also stimulated tissue growth and cell differentiation, as one of Hypericum perforatum's main ingredients, hyperforin, was shown to activate TRPC6 channel which had been recognised as an activator of keratinocyte differentiation. Another potentially useful activities could be its inhibitory effects on epidermal Langerhans cells. Chosen test sites will be the forearms.Treated forearm and test sites sequence on forearms will be prospectively randomized (double randomization). (Source: clinicaltrials.gov)

Plant

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When an animal eats St. Johnswort, the poisonous compound in the plant, hypericin, reaches the skin from an internal route (stomach to blood to skin). Here it sensitizes the skin to sunlight. Pigments in the skin shield colored skin from sunrays so that only white or unpigmented areas are affected. Photosensitized lesions itch, become red, swollen, and sore, and the skin may peel or come off in large sheets. White-skinned cattle are more susceptible to St. Johnswort poisoning than white-skinned sheep.

Hypericum perforatum, more commonly known as St. John's wort, is a native flowering perennial plant of Eurasia. It has been widely introduced, mainly by human vectors, to North and South America, parts of Africa, Australia and New Zealand. St. John's wort can survive in a wide range of environments and has the ability to store reserves in its root crown and compensate during harsh times, which makes this plant difficult for management control. In recent years Hypericum perforatum has gained media attention for its use in alternative medicine, mainly for treating depression. (Source: www.iucngisd.org)

 

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