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How to Propagate Foxglove

How to Propagate Foxglove

How to Propagate Foxglove

Gardeners who add the beautiful foxglove flower to a growing area often grow this plant for the lovely blossoms that grow up and down the tall plant stalks. When you propagate foxgloves in a growing area, you plant the seeds one year and the seeds will self-sow in the autumn to produce another bountiful array of foxglove blossoms the following year. Foxgloves are biennial plants, meaning the plants return a second year after the first year you plant them.Watch for the foxglove plants to return the following spring. Fertilize the plants once per month with an all-purpose fertilizer. Allow the plants to grow and bloom without pruning at all, because this is the way foxglove propagates itself. As the flowers fade, they will drop seeds onto the soil and these seeds will grow into new foxglove plants the following growing season.

Foxglove

Foxgloves (Digitalis spp.) grow up to 5 feet tall, producing spikes of tubular flowers in summer. Biennial foxgloves, such as Digitalis purpurea, which grows in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 4 to 8, are propagated from purchased or saved seed any time during spring or summer, but they won't bloom until the following summer. Perennial varieties, such as yellow foxglove (Digitalis grandiflora), is more commonly propagated from divisions in early fall. This variety thrives in USDA zones 3 to 8.Replant each foxglove division at the same depth it was growing at before division. Dig a hole to the same planting depth, but make a small 2-inch mound in the bottom of the hole. Spread the roots over the soil mound after placing the division into the hole, then fill the hole with soil. Space the plants about 12 inches apart in all directions and water immediately after planting. They will fill in the bed as they put on new growth the following summer.

Within the Digitalis genus, there are several biennial, perennial, and shrub species that all carry the common name foxglove, but the one most popular as a garden plant is the common foxglove—Digitalis purpurea. Common foxglove is a uniquely eye-catching plant, a tall, slender specimen with tubular blooms, often with colorful speckles. It is a fast-growing plant that generally flowers in its second season before dying. In its first year, the plant produces only a basal clump of foliage, but in its second year, the plant sends forth 2- to 5-foot tall stalks lined with beautiful funnel-shaped pink, white, or purple flowers with white or purple spots lining the throats.Foxgloves are fairly easy plants to grow in moist, rich soil in full sun to partial shade. Foxgloves come in different sizes and should be spaced accordingly, but as a general rule, it is good to space them about 2 feet apart. Stake the taller types to prevent them from flopping over in a wind storm. They can become somewhat scraggly after flowering is complete, so the plants are often pulled from the garden at this point—or immediately after the seeds have scattered themselves in the garden. (Source: www.thespruce.com)

 

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