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How to Get Violet Out of Lawn

How to Get Violet Out of Lawn

How to Get Violet Out of Lawn

These are perennial plants that spread both by rhizomes and by seeds. Lawns that are not well maintained are often colonized by spreads of violets. Shady areas of a lawn are especially susceptible to a wild violet takeover. Very few homeowners in the eastern or midwestern U.S. have not seen wild violets in their lawns at some point. They grow in USDA hardiness zones 3 to 9. Using herbicide to eradicate wild violets is best undertaken in the fall. At this time, the herbicide will be transported down to the taproot as the plant stores nutrients for winter. Thus, you have a good chance of the herbicide killing the plant down to ground level with a fall application. If you use herbicide in the spring or summer, it might only temporarily kill the surface leaves, allowing the plant to rebound.

Violet

Hand weeding: Pulling up wild violets by hand may be labor-intensive, but it is also the least harmful way to rid your yard of these plants. Hand weed in the spring and summer when the plants are growing fastest, be sure to dampen the soil, and use a hoe or other weeding tool so you can pull out the entire root system. “When leaves and flowers are plucked from above, the rhizomes will continue to send out new growth,” explains Shipman. “Be sure to remove the entire plant so the rhizomes don’t re-sprout.” Wild Violets are perennial flowers with predictably dark purple flowers that bloom in the Spring. The flower color can vary from white or very light purple to blue-ish purple to dark purple and sometimes even yellow. They have low-growing waxy, dark green, heart-shaped leaves that form a cone. The leaves do not lose their color in the Fall or Winter. Their short stature ensures that lawnmowers do not cut their leaves. Their petite flowers attract pollinators in the Spring and Summer. Wild Violets grow in USDA Hardiness Zones 3-9.

Wild Violets grow best in shady, moist, and fertile soil. They spread via underground root systems and seeds. Seed pods grow in small capsules at the base of the plant that look like they might bloom into flowers. Wild Violets form large colonies, connecting via their underground roots: rhizomes. They often occur in newer developments that were previously wooded or in established yards with forests nearby. You’re not just imagining it. The truth is, the aggressive nature of both ground ivy and violets makes these weeds two of the toughest to get rid of. Your fight against them can almost feel futile as they seem to fight back harder. When it comes to getting rid of ground ivy and violets, you’ll want to take the mentality of “losing the battle but winning the war” to heart. It’s going to be a long road, but the right treatment approach by a professional can get you there. (Source:www.joshuatreeexperts.com)

 

 

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