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Hardy Rose Bushes for Minnesota

Hardy Rose Bushes for Minnesota

Hardy Rose Bushes for Minnesota

The showy ‘Summer Waltz’ rose, released in 2012, is covered with double-cupped frilly pink flowers, blooming through- out the season until frost. The lightly fragrant flowers fade to light pink as they age. As with most repeat blooming roses, there is partial die back of the crown to winter injury. It is tolerant of black spot fungus—plants may get a little, but it doesn’t impact plant appearance or performance. ‘Summer Waltz’ is available only at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Auxilary Plant Sale each May.

Rose

Black spot fungus has challenged rose gardeners for centuries. Using black spot isolates collected from across eastern North America, University scientists can characterize the molecular diversity of the fungus. Rose genotypes are inoculated with black spot isolates to determine the race diversity of the isolates. Breeders then identify black spot resistance genes in rose germplasm and begin the process of incorporating those genes into cold-hardy shrub roses. William Baffin and Ramblin’ Red perform well in our zone and put on quite a show even in their first year. Subsequent years, however, are even more spectacular as the vines grow taller and are loaded with flowers top to bottom. David Zlezack, Ph.D., a renowned plant breeder from just over the boarder at the University of Wisconsin, River Falls, has introduced some amazing hardy roses to the market. Our favorite Zlezack introduction is Above and Beyond, a hardy climbing rose with a delicious combination of white, pale yellow, and apricot blooms all together on the same plant. 10-14 feet tall.

What is a shrub rose? A shrub rose is any rose that does not fit into a traditional classification such as hybrid tea, floribunda, miniature or old garden rose. Recently “shrub rose” has incorrectly come to mean “hardy”. In the Midwest shrub roses can be described as hardy, needing little or no winter protection or semi-hardy, requiring winter protection. The semi-hardy roses include the roses of Dr. Griffith Buck, the English Roses of David Austin, the Romantica and Generosa Series. Hardy shrub roses include the rugosas, many old garden and species roses and the Explorer and Parkland Series from Agriculture Canada. If you've wandered through any of the colorful rose gardens in Minnesota, you may be wondering if you could include some of this beauty in your own yard. You've heard that roses are time consuming and challenging to grow. Tales of powdery mildew, aphids and the "Minnesota tip" have discouraged you from planting roses in the past. Don't fret! You can have roses in your garden with minimum maintenance and maximum color! How: by planting northern hardy shrub roses. (Source: www.agweek.com)

 

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