FutureStarr

Greater Los Angeles

Greater Los Angeles

Greater Los Angeles

A video showing the process of redevelopment of a stretch of 33rd Street in South L.A. that had been taken over by homeless individuals. The project reclaimed the street and will create hundreds of units of affordable housing and low-income seniors homes while also opening up new public space and connecting residents to the craft brewery, The Factory Brewery.

LOS

Los Angeles' reputation for sprawl is due to the fact that the city grew from relative obscurity to one of the country's ten largest cities (i.e. 10th largest city in 1920), at a time when suburban patterns of growth first became possible due to electric streetcars and automobiles. The city was also the first large American city where, in the 1920s, major clusters of regional employment, shopping, and culture were already being built outside the traditional downtown areas – in edge cities such as Mid-Wilshire, Miracle Mile and Hollywood. This pattern of growth continued ever outward, more so when the freeway system was built starting in the 1950s; thus Greater Los Angeles was the earliest large American metropolitan area with a decentralized structure. Its major commercial, financial, and cultural institutions are geographically dispersed rather than being concentrated in a single downtown or central area. Also, the population density of Los Angeles proper is low (approximately 8,100 people per square mile) when compared to some other large American cities such as New York (27,500), San Francisco (17,000), Boston (13,300), and Chicago (11,800).

Within its urbanized areas, Los Angeles is noted for having small lot sizes and low-rise buildings. Buildings in the area are low when compared to other large cities, mainly due to zoning regulations. Los Angeles became a major city just as the Pacific Electric Railway spread population to smaller cities much as interurbans did in East Coast cities. In the first decades of the twentieth century, the area was marked by a network of fairly dense but separate cities linked by rail. The ascendance of the automobile helped fill in the gaps between these commuter towns with lower-density settlements. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

TIME

DEAF INTERPRETER: Winter is coming soon so we want to be ready for the cold weather, rain, wind, freezing temperatures, to be sure that our bodies are ready. Remember last winter we had to deal with both COVID and colds/flu at the same time. Remember many people got sick all over the state? People were getting each other sick. This year we are ready and are watching to make sure that what happened last year does not happen again. Please, if you feel sick, stay home. If you must go out, stay 6 feet apart, wear your mask. Remember, COVID is still around. It is not gone yet

While the New York metropolitan area is presently the most populous metropolitan area in the United States, it has been predicted in the past that Greater Los Angeles will eventually surpass Greater New York in population. Whether this will happen is yet to be seen, but past predictions on this event have been off the mark. A 1966 article in Time predicted Greater Los Angeles would surpass New York by 1975, and that by 1990, would reach close to the 19 million mark. But the article's flawed definition of Greater Los Angeles included San Diego, which is actually its own metropolitan area. A 1989 article in The New York Times predicted Greater Los Angeles would surpass Greater New York by 2010, but the article predicted the population would be 18.3 million in that year, a number Greater New York has already surpassed as of 2007 by half a million people. As of 2009, the New York metropolitan area had a population of 22.2 million compared to the Greater Los Angeles Area's 18.7 million, about a 3.56 million persons difference. Percentage growth, however, has been higher in Greater Los Angeles over the past few decades than in Greater New York. (Source: kids.kiddle.co)

 

 

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