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Ginger Starts

Ginger Starts

Ginger Starts

The main active components in ginger are gingerols, which are responsible for its distinct fragrance and flavor. Gingerols are powerful anti-inflammatory compounds that can help alleviate the pain caused by arthritis. Studies have also shown that ginger helps boost the immune system, protect against colorectal cancer, and induce cell death in ovarian cancer.

Ginger

Ginger Root (Zingiber officinale), also known as common ginger, is a herbaceous perennial native to Asia, where it is grown commercially. The edible part of the plant is the fat, knobbly, underground rhizome, and it is one of the most popular spices used worldwide. Although the shoots can produce flowers, they aren't considered ornamentally significant, and container plants rarely bloom. If you are growing ginger in good, rich soil it shouldn’t need anything extra. I grow mine in tubs. I put in fresh compost mix every year and never add any extra fertilizer. If you don’t have good soil, or if you are growing ginger in some standard bought potting mix, then you have to feed it regularly. You will also have to feed it if you are growing ginger in an area that gets torrential summer rains (many tropical regions do). Such rains leach all the goodness from the soil. Work in some organic slow release fertilizer at planting time. After that you can use some liquid fertilizer like seaweed extract or fish fertilizer every few weeks.

How to cut ginger: Using a sharp knife that has been sterilized in high-proof alcohol between cuts, cut your ginger into pieces that are roughly 1–2oz or 2–3". We recommend cutting each finger at the narrow base about 1/4" above where it connects to the main rhizome, leaving a tiny stump behind. This extra piece accounts for shrinkage as the cut surface dries, and will prevent sunken areas. Place the cut pieces on a rack with good airflow for about 5 days until the cut areas dry down and cure, and then begin the sprouting process as below. If you can’t begin sprouting your seed immediately, rhizomes can be stored at above 65° for several weeks. Definitely start sprouting by mid-April. To sprout your ginger or turmeric stock, spread 3" of good potting soil in a crate or other well-drained container, arrange the rhizomes on top so they aren’t touching, and add soil to cover by a few inches. Our seed ginger will need to be cut into planting-sized pieces; for turmeric, snap off some of the larger “fingers” and plant the main rhizome with a few of the smaller “fingers” still attached. Nutrient-rich potting soil such as Vermont Compost Fort Vee gives them a great head start. (Source: www.fedcoseeds.com)

 

 

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