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Georgy girl song

Georgy girl song

Georgy girl song

People don’t resolve blockages as easily as once thought. But even when it’s controlled for conditions like age and geographic location, the number still remains. There seems to be a growing number of people seeking alternative routes to pressure relief, but it’s unclear how much relief the self-administered methods truly provide.

Georgy

She had a global smash with her second novel, written at the age of 27, and she surely must have accepted at a certain point that that particular lightning would not strike again and that her obituaries would be headlined "Georgy Girl Writer Dies". But without Miss Forster we wouldn't have had the book. And without the book we wouldn't have had the film. And without the film we wouldn't have had:Georgy Girl (1965) told the story of an awkward galumphing working-class lass in the new London faced with the unsatisfying romantic choice of a dour older man who's her dad's boss or, alternatively, the errant lover of her glamorous and promiscuous flatmate. It was a hit, and Miss Forster used £4,000 of her royalties to buy her mum a bungalow. The following year it was turned into an even more successful film with Lynn Redgrave as Georgy and a stellar supporting cast - James Mason, Alan Bates, Charlotte Rampling, and Lynn's own mother, Rachel Kempson. Miss Forster adapted the novel with the playwright Peter Nichols, and they turned in a taut, tart script on contemporary London life: "God always has another custard pie up his sleeve," as Miss Redgrave remarks at one point.

I can't remember his explanation for how a Carry On actor got to write a movie song for Lynn Redgrave, James Mason and Alan Bates, but he gave the impression that in Swingin' London back then everyone knew everyone (Michael Caine was John Barry's flatmate, etc) so he had a go at songwriting and found he rather enjoyed it. In case you're wondering, his other hit was "Dick-A-Dum-Dum". Des O'Connor had the hit with it, but no respect to Des (for whom I have the greatest respect) but I have always preferred the composer's original. If you can get beyond the faintly preposterous hook, this is an even more precise time capsule of the Carnaby Street era than "Georgy Girl", with its references to go-go girls, boutiques, mini cars, Kings Road... And of course each section ends with a highly emphatic "giiiiiirrrrl", whether of the real sweet, real cute or real shy variety:"Dick-a-Dum-Dum" is perhaps a bit too particular ever to take off quite the way "Georgy Girl" did. "It's a brilliant lyric," said Judith Durham, "especially for me with my self-esteem problems. It's always been the perfect lyric for me to sing": (Source: www.steynonline.com)

 

 

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