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Georgia pine

Georgia pine

Georgia pine

Georgia pine is a deciduous coniferous tree, 50–70 m (165–230 ft) tall, with a trunk 6–12 m (20–40 ft) in diameter, a conical or rounded crown, and thick, compressed needle-like leaves about 3 cm (1. 2 in) long. Its wood is bright white, soft and mild.This morning the white and brown color of the tree did not frighten me; the orange flames that danced round the charred trunk, however, did.

Pine

Earlier this month, Danny, bassist Luke, lead guitarist James Tranter, from Coventry, and James Dudley, from Bedworth, launched the band's third EP, Georgia Pine, at the Sunflower Lounge in Birmingham city centre and it was, apparently, quite a night. Plants of this endemic mint genus of the Southeastern Coastal Plain were first gathered by Stephen Elliott (1771-1830) in his 1818 excursion through the sandhills of the Georgia pine barrens along the historic Federal Road and were subsequently described and named "Ceranthera linearifolia" by him in his Sketch (1821).

The lack of medium-tall trees (called a midstory canopy) leads to open longleaf pine forests or savannas. New seedlings do not appear at all tree-like and resemble a dark-green fountain of needles. This form is called the grass stage. During this stage, which lasts for 5–12 years, vertical growth is very slow, and the tree may take a number of years simply to grow ankle high. After that, it has a growth spurt, especially if it is in a gap or no tree canopy is above it. In the grass stage, it is very resistant to low intensity fires because the terminal bud is protected from lethal heating by the tightly packed needles. While relatively immune to fire at this stage, the plant is quite appealing to feral pigs; the early settlers' habit of releasing swine into the woodlands to feed may have been partly responsible for the decline of the species. The USDA offers cost-sharing and technical assistance to private landowners for longleaf restoration through the NRCS Longleaf Pine Initiative. Similar programs are available through most state forestry agencies in the longleaf's native range. In August 2009, the Alabama Forestry Commission received $1.757 million in stimulus money to restore longleaf pines in state forests. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

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