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Georgia historic newspapers

Georgia historic newspapers

Georgia historic newspapers

These digital learning resources give users a great overview of the history and development of Georgia's newspapers and related developments in the American colonies as a whole. The GeoJournal provides introductions, backstory, and articles for 58 of the state's newspapers, starting with the Columbus-owned American Daily Advertiser in 1786.

Georgia

This past spring and summer, the Digital Library of Georgia released several new grant-funded newspaper titles to the Georgia Historic Newspapers website. Included below is a list of the newly available titles. itles funded by the Georgia Public Library Service, a unit of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, using federal Library Services and Technology Act funds administered through the Institute for Museum and Library Services .This Georgia historical newspapers page has links to Quick Start Guides for historical newspaper archives, provided through GALILEO and the Digital Library of Georgia (DLG) GA Historic Newspapers Collection (U.S.)Newspaper titles are regularly digitized and added to the archive. If you are interested in including a particular title, you can visit our participation page. A majority of the newspapers on this site were digitized from the microfilm produced by the Georgia Newspaper Project (GNP).

Subjects: Academic Integrity, Astronomy, Biochemistry, Biography, Biology, Chemistry, Citing Sources, Civil Engineering, Computer Science, Construction Management, Cybersecurity, Electrical Engineering, Engineering, Geography, Geology, Geology & Geography, Georgia State Information, Government Information, Historical Newspapers, Information Systems, Information Technology, Manufacturing Engineering, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Physics & Astronomy, Psychology, Science & Mathematics, Special Collections, Statistics.“Historic newspapers provide a unique look at our state over time. They are invaluable to scholars and the general public alike as they provide in-depth coverage of Georgia counties and cities, report on the activities of state and local government, and reflect the social and cultural values of the time that they were created. By far, they are DLG’s most popular resources,” remarked Sheila McAlister, director of the Digital Library of Georgia. “We’re grateful for the assistance of our partners as we continue to add new content and improve how our users interact with these important historic documents.” (Source: libs.uga.edu)

 

 

 

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