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Fringed Loosestrife Firecracker

Fringed Loosestrife Firecracker

Fringed Loosestrife Firecracker

 

Noted for its striking foliage, Lysimachia ciliata 'Firecracker' (Fringed Loosestrife) is an upright, rhizomatous perennial forming a mound of whorled, lance-shaped, rich burgundy-purple leaves, 4-6 in. long (10-15 cm). By mid to late summer, the foliage tends to soften and become more or less green. But then, the plant is studded with nodding, star-shaped butter-yellow flowers, 1 in. across (2.5cm). Borne singly or in twos in the upper leaf axils, the blossoms often have a raspberry blotch at the base of each petal. Easy to grow, Lysimachia ciliata 'Firecracker' is valuable as a contrast plant in the garden thanks to its chocolate foliage. However, Fringed Loosestrife spreads fairly quickly and needs to be divided regularly when grown in confined spaces. It is often grown in moist borders or beside ponds.

Loosestrife

This is a colourful selection of a native North American wildflower, forming an upright mound of rich burgundy-purple leaves, studded with starry yellow flowers in the summer. Will spread to form a sizeable patch, sometimes too vigorous for the border but terrific in containers or among shrubs. Valuable as a contrast plant in the border, especially nice combined with orange or red-flowered neighbours, or with silvery Artemisia. Also terrific with late-flowering tulips, acting as a good mask for the dying bulb leaves. Tolerates wet soil. Excellent for cutting. The best foliage colour is early in the season, the leaves becoming more or less green by mid to late summer. Received a Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit (1996). Not to be confused with the noxious weed, Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria).Valuable as a contrast plant in the border, especially nice combined with orange or red-flowered neighbours, or with silvery Artemisia. Also terrific with late-flowering tulips, acting as a good mask for the dying bulb leaves. Tolerates wet soil. Excellent for cutting. The best foliage colour is early in the season, the leaves becoming more or less green by mid to late summer. Received a Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit (1996). Not to be confused with the noxious weed, Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria).

Fringed yellow-loosestrife is an erect to sprawling, often branched perennial, usually 1-2 ft. tall, forming large masses of pale-green, lance-shaped foliage. An erect stem, unbranched or branched, bearing yellow flowers rising on stalks in axils of opposite leaves; leafstalks fringed with spreading hairs. Five-petaled, yellow flowers droop from stalks which arise from the axils of opposite leaves. The name emphasizes the hairy leafstalks of this wetland plant, which is sometimes placed in the genus Steironema. Southern Loosestrife (L. tonsa) has smooth leafstalks, grows only to 3' (90 cm) tall, and occurs from Kentucky and Virginia south to Georgia and west to Texas. Lance-leaved Loosestrife (L. lanceolata) has narrow leaves tapering to the base and occurs in a range similar to that of Fringed Loosestrife but not in Canada or the northern Plains states. Trailing Loosestrife (L. radicans) has very weak stems, virtually trailing on the ground, and occurs in the south-central United States east to Florida and Virginia. (Source: www.wildflower.org)

 

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