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Ford Maverick

Ford Maverick

Ford Maverick

Ford Maverick

Ford is reviving its Maverick nameplate from the 1980s. This time around, the high-performance utility vehicle will use high-strength steel and aluminum in order to meet tough new safety and fuel economy standards. Ford expects models to start arriving in showrooms in 2013.

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The Maverick is roughly the size of the previous-gen Ranger that Ford dropped a decade ago. It has a very affordable starting price. It is available only as a four-door crew-cab model in three trim levels: XL, XLT, and Lariat. And its arrival is meaningful: With the Maverick, and also the new-for-2022 Hyundai Santa Cruz, small trucks are back.

Morphing a compact SUV into a pickup brings an unusual amalgam of car and truck traits. For example, massive, antisocial levels of wheelspin with the turbocharged front-drive, even from a rolling start. We'd recommend opting for all-wheel drive ($2220) with the more powerful engine. In addition to the added traction, all-wheel drive brings with it an independent rear suspension, which replaces a torsion beam in the front-drivers. Over the road, the Maverick has the resolute solidity of a unibody SUV with a firm ride that enables the lofty payload and benefits body control. A flourish is playful lift-throttle rotation at the limit, reminiscent of the compact hatchbacks that Ford no longer sells. But the stability control can't be completely disabled, so it's a short-lived thrill. The steering has a truckish imprecision, and efforts are on the high side, while the brake feel from the upsized brakes, relative to the Escape or Bronco Sport, is solid and confidence inspiring. In our 70-to-zero-mph brake test, the Maverick stopped in 172 feet, about in line with the Hyundai Santa Cruz and better than what we've measured in a Honda Ridgeline or the Maverick's big-brother Ranger. The Maverick's 2.0-liter is muted. Wringing it out brings mostly flow noise from the exhaust system. But it's quick; the sprint to 60 mph in an all-wheel-drive FX4 we tested came in at 5.9 seconds. And, in our 75-mph highway fuel-economy test, the Maverick matched its 29-mpg EPA highway figure. (Source: www.caranddriver.com)

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The Maverick is roughly the size of the previous-gen Ranger that Ford dropped a decade ago. It has a very affordable starting price. It is available only as a four-door crew-cab model in three trim levels: XL, XLT, and Lariat. And its arrival is meaningful: With the Maverick, and also the new-for-2022 Hyundai Santa Cruz, small trucks are back.

To keep the base price under $20K, Ford provided a color LCD center display, telematics, 4G connection, Bluetooth and USB jacks and standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. This assumes that every owner will have a smartphone with navigation, and that’s a safe bet. As on the lower trims of the new Honda Civic, automakers are discovering that many users just like their phone interfaces and would rather use them. If they save some money in the process, so much the better. (Source: www.forbes.com)

 

 

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