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Find a grave

Find a grave

Find a grave

I don’t have a tongue. I don’t have a skeleton. I don’t have a heart. I don’t have lungs. I don’t have a mind. I don’t have organs.If you take a walk outside on any quiet Saturday morning, you might come across the aftermath of a death. Whether it’s crosses, headstones, flowers, or some other sign, there will always be a gravestone to remind us of the fallen. But where do they go?

GRAVE

Find a Grave got its start in 1995 when founder Jim Tipton built a website to share his hobby of visiting the graves of famous people. The website attracted thousands of visitors and soon grew to be more than just a collection of famous people’s graves, as volunteers began uploading images of headstones, burial information, and personal memorials from around the world. Note: Corrections to memorials can be submitted on the Find a Grave site. When viewing a record in this database, you can navigate to the corresponding memorial on Find a Grave by clicking "Go to website" or clicking on the Find a Grave URL. Once viewing the memorial on Find a Grave, corrections can be submitted by clicking the 'edit' tab. In 2013, Tipton sold Find a Grave to Ancestry.com, stating the genealogy company had "been linking and driving traffic to the site for several years. Burial information is a wonderful source for people researching their family history." In a September 30, 2013 press release, Ancestry.com officials said they would "launch a new mobile app, improve customer support, [and] introduce an enhanced edit system for submitting updates to memorials, foreign-language support, and other site improvements.

" The website contains listings of cemeteries and graves from around the world. American cemeteries are organized by state and county, and many cemetery records contain Google Maps (with GPS coordinates supplied by contributors) and photographs of the cemeteries and gravesites. Individual grave records may contain dates and places of birth and death, biographical information, cemetery and plot information, photographs (of the grave marker, the individual, etc.), and contributor information. Any member may also add photographs and notations to individual listings; notations may include images of flowers, flags, religious, or other symbols, and often include a message of sympathy or condolence. Members may post requests for photos of a specific grave; these requests will be automatically sent to other members who have registered their location as being near that grave. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

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