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Example of metaphor

Example of metaphor

Example of metaphor

In the life of a plant, there are many moments where death is very real. That moment where the plant sends its roots out to find love and sustenance, only to realize they are deep underground, suffocating as they grow just enough to not be able to sustain themselves directly. When they do not find anything, they die. The life of the plant is not death, but it is a moment that forces the plant to realize what is important and what is not.Metaphors can make your words come to life (or in the case of the exam, to death). Often, you can use a metaphor to make your subject more relatable to the reader or to make a complex thought easier to understand. They can also be a tremendous help when you want to enhance your writing with imagery. As a common figure of speech, metaphors turn up everywhere from novels and films to presidential speeches and even popular songs. When they’re especially good, they’re hard to miss.

METAPHOR

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For example, one of the most famous metaphors in literature is featured in this line from William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet: What light through yonder window breaks? It is the East, and Juliet, the sun! In this metaphor, Juliet is compared to the sun. In fact, this figure of speech claims that Juliet is the sun. Of course, the reader understands that Romeo does not believe that Juliet is literally the sun. Instead, the comparison demonstrates the idea that Romeo equates Juliet with the beauty, awe, and life-giving force of the sun. To Romeo, symbolically, Juliet and the sun are the same. In this poem, Frost compares end-of-world destructive forces to both fire and ice. These are metaphors that serve as figures of speech in the sense that the poet does not literally mean that the world will end because of fire and ice. Instead, fire represents destructive forces associated with desire, such as power, jealousy, and anger. Similarly, ice represents destructive forces associated with hate, such as prejudice, hostility, and isolation. These metaphors are an effective literary device in that it causes the reader to consider that desire and hatred are as destructive as fire and ice.

In this poem, Hughes utilizes metaphor to compare life to a broken-winged bird and a barren field as consequences to the loss of dreams. In the first stanza, Hughes claims that if dreams die then life is a “broken-winged bird that cannot fly.” This is a significant use of metaphor in that it characterizes life without dreams as something fragile that has been irreparably harmed. The metaphor creates an image for the reader of a bird that is wounded, grounded, and unable to reach its purpose or potential. If life is this bird, then, without dreams, it is also wounded, grounded, and thwarted in purpose. She’s the man of the house! What do you think the above sentence implies? The ‘woman’ is being called the ‘man’ to draw a parallel with the idea of taking all the responsibility and being the bread earner in the house. This was an example of a common metaphor! Metaphors are widely used across the English language and hold an important place in exams like IELTS, TOEFL, PTE, TOEIC, and many more. If you are preparing for English for competitive exams, then this blog on common metaphors with meanings can help you out in many ways. Read on to know more! (Source: leverageedu.com)

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Allegory is a literary and rhetorical device that is essentially a complex, extended metaphor. To employ an allegory, an author uses a person, thing, image, or idea that, when interpreted, expresses hidden, symbolic, or secondary meaning. For example, George Orwell is well known for using this technique in his book Animal Farm, where the pigs on the farm are an allegory for important political figures from the Russian Revolution. A metaphor is generally just a phrase, but an allegory “extends” a metaphor (i.e. pigs as politicians) by drawing it out and using it to convey more complex beliefs or ideas.Here’s some food for thought (35): you’ve probably already used a metaphor (or more) in your daily speech today without even realizing it. Metaphorical expressions pepper the English language by helping us illustrate and pinpoint exactly what we want to say. As a result, metaphors are everywhere in our common vocabulary: you may even be drowning in a sea (36) of them as we speak. But let’s cut to our list of metaphor examples before we jump the shark (37).

Complex: a metaphor in which the literal meaning is expressed through more than one figurative term (a combination of primary metaphors). The website Changing Minds says that a complex metaphor occurs where a simple metaphor is based on a "secondary metaphoric element," such as using the term "light" to indicate understanding, as in the sentence "He threw light on the subject." Changing Minds also gives these examples: Metaphors are most frequently compared with similes. It is said, for instance, that a metaphor is 'a condensed analogy' or 'analogical fusion' or that they 'operate in a similar fashion' or are 'based on the same mental process' or yet that 'the basic processes of analogy are at work in metaphor'. It is also pointed out that 'a border between metaphor and analogy is fuzzy' and 'the difference between them might be described (metaphorically) as the distance between things being compared'. A metaphor asserts the objects in the comparison are identical on the point of comparison, while a simile merely asserts a similarity through use of words such as "like" or "as". For this reason a common-type metaphor is generally considered more forceful than a simile. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

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