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El Rancho

El Rancho

El Rancho

El Rancho

If you’ve ever been to El Rancho, it’s like one of those quintessential Mexican restaurants. Enthusiastic staff, red-checked tablecloths, and walls lined with cowboy hats. But step into the kitchen and you’ll find a surprisingly modern, high-tech set-up.

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I like shopping here because it reminds me of local markets in Mexico. I always come away with items for restocking my pantry, as well as with products I’ve never tried before. Here are ten of my favorite things to buy at El Rancho.

Tacos: One of the first things you will see upon entering El Rancho is a taqueria serving a variety of tacos, which are a full meal when accompanied by sides such as rice and beans. There’s nothing like snacking on a couple of tacos to get you in the mood for shopping, and at a cost of $1 to $2 each, it’s also inexpensive. Choose from fillings like fajita, barbacoa, pastor, carne asada and many others. (Source: houstonfoodfinder.com)

Rancho

I like shopping here because it reminds me of local markets in Mexico. I always come away with items for restocking my pantry, as well as with products I’ve never tried before. Here are ten of my favorite things to buy at El Rancho.

La Molienda Mixnut Bar: El Rancho offers a variety of Mexican candy. While some are too sweet for my taste, the ones made with coconut, dulce de leche (caramel), candied fruit and nuts are among my favorites. The La Molienda Mixnut Bar is a peanut brittle bar made with raisins, sesame seeds and pumpkin seeds. It is crunchy, tasty and very filling, and makes for a great and satisfying snack. (Source: houstonfoodfinder.com)

Palce

Carne: At the meat counter, I buy the pre-seasoned meat, trimmed and seasoned by skilled butchers and sold by the pound. Among my favorites are the beef and chicken fajitas, the carne asada, costillas de puerco (pork ribs) and the chorizo suelto. I also like the thick-cut bacon, which is sold for $3.40 a pound, which is a particularly good value. Here you will also find chicharones (pork rinds). If you’ve been to a market in Mexico, you may have watched the skin puff up the minute it’s placed in a big vat of boiling oil. You can also purchase manteca de puerco (lard).

In 1952, three stockholders in the resort filed a federal suit, alleging that majority holders such as Beldon Katleman did not acknowledge the sale of 495 shares which were purchased by the minority holders. The shares had previously been owned by Jake Katleman until his death. The suit requested that the El Rancho Vegas be placed into receivership, although this effort was unsuccessful. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

 

 

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