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Egypt on a Map

Egypt on a Map

Egypt on a Map

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It’s important to remember to not over-complicate things and not over-present things. It’s really about clearly presenting the basics, answering questions people have about the Egypt project. When you look at the map and see it like that, it’s a much clearer framework for people.

Africa

Egypt is a transcontinental country that stretches from the northeast corner of Africa to the southwest corner of Asia. The Sinai Peninsula of Egypt acts as the land bridge between these two continents. Egypt is located in the Northern and Eastern Hemispheres of the Earth. It has land borders with Sudan to the south, Libya to the west, Israel and the Gaza Strip to the northeast. To the north, Egypt has a coastline on the Mediterranean Sea while the Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba border it to the east.

Covering an area of about 1,002,450 square kilometers (387,050 sq mi), Egypt borders Libya to the west, Sudan to the south and Palestine and Israel to the east. Its northern coast borders the Mediterranean Sea; the eastern coast borders the Red Sea. Egypt is famous for its ancient civilization and some of the world's oldest monuments, including the Giza pyramid complex with the Great Sphinx, the step pyramid at Sakkara, Edfu Temple, Abu Simbel, etc. The southern city of Luxor contains numerous ancient artifacts, such as the Karnak Temple and the Valley of the Kings. Egypt is widely regarded as an important political and cultural nation of the Middle East, as center of the Arab World. Egypt, historically, has been the northern "Gateway to Africa" with many scientific expeditions organized from Cairo. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

World

Until the Muslim conquest, great continuity had typified Egyptian rural life. Despite the incongruent ethnicity of successive ruling groups and the cosmopolitan nature of Egypt’s larger urban centres, the language and culture of the rural, agrarian masses—whose lives were largely measured by the annual rise and fall of the Nile River, with its annual inundation—had changed only marginally throughout the centuries. Following the conquests, both urban and rural culture began to adopt elements of Arab culture, and an Arabic vernacular eventually replaced the Egyptian language as the common means of spoken discourse. Moreover, since that time, Egypt’s history has been part of the broader Islamic world, and though Egyptians continued to be ruled by foreign elite—whether Arab, Kurdish, Circassian, or Turkish—the country’s cultural milieu remained predominantly Arab.

During the Cold War, Egypt’s central role in the Arabic-speaking world increased its geopolitical importance as Arab nationalism and inter-Arab relations became powerful and emotional political forces in the Middle East and North Africa. Egypt led the Arab states in a series of wars against Israel but was the first of those states to make peace with the Jewish state, which it did in 1979. (Source: www.britannica.com)

 

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