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Don't be a menace ANY

Don't be a menace ANY

Don't be a menace

This parody has moments that are still hilarious decades after its initial release. Don't Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood is at its best and most timeless when the humor transcends the genre of the movies it's parodying. The recurring joke of Keenen Ivory Wayans as the mailman who turns to the camera and yells "Message!" whenever a heavy-handed comment on society is shoehorned into the story; comments on the lack of positive roles for African-American actresses in Hollywood; and a group of LAPD detectives in the station gathered around an arcade game modeled after the Rodney King case are all moments of barbed humor reminiscent of the Wayans' best sketches on In Living Color. The references to the OJ Simpson case and Bernie Mac as a black police officer who hates black people have also stood the test of time.

CENTRAL WHILE DRINKING

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Don't Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking your Juice in the Hood" is a parody of several U.S. films about being in the 'Hood', for instance "Boyz n the Hood", "South Central", "Menace II Society", "Higher Learning" and "Juice". We follow Ashtray as he returns to the place he grew up in and meet his father and his basket-case friends. Crazy stuff happens. For example, Ashtray is older than his father and his best friend Loc Dog's grandmother is a trigger-happy old lady who blames her eccentric-looking kid for not being tough enough. Don't Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood (or Don't Be A Menace for short) is a 1996 Wayans Brothers parody of "growing up in the hood" movies, particularly, as the name suggests, Menace II Society, South Central, Juice, and Boyz n the Hood. Taking every trope those movies were known for and turning them upside down, this movie is considered one of the funniest movies the Wayans ever made.

This parody has moments that are still hilarious decades after its initial release. Don't Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood is at its best and most timeless when the humor transcends the genre of the movies it's parodying. The recurring joke of Keenen Ivory Wayans as the mailman who turns to the camera and yells "Message!" whenever a heavy-handed comment on society is shoehorned into the story; comments on the lack of positive roles for African-American actresses in Hollywood; and a group of LAPD detectives in the station gathered around an arcade game modeled after the Rodney King case are all moments of barbed humor reminiscent of the Wayans' best sketches on In Living Color. The references to the OJ Simpson case and Bernie Mac as a black police officer who hates black people have also stood the test of time. The title spells it out: Paris Barclay's "Don’t Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood" is a post-"Airplane," pre-"Scary Movie" send-up of 1990s-style urban, African American-centric cinema. Skewering films like "Boys n the Hood," Poetic Justice," and dozens of like-minded cinematic cliches, the film ranges from legitimately funny to uncomfortably tedious. While it is a complete mixed bag, the film's strongest moments make it, at least, watchable. (Source: letterboxd.com)

CENTRAL

via GIPHY

This parody has moments that are still hilarious decades after its initial release. Don't Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood is at its best and most timeless when the humor transcends the genre of the movies it's parodying. The recurring joke of Keenen Ivory Wayans as the mailman who turns to the camera and yells "Message!" whenever a heavy-handed comment on society is shoehorned into the story; comments on the lack of positive roles for African-American actresses in Hollywood; and a group of LAPD detectives in the station gathered around an arcade game modeled after the Rodney King case are all moments of barbed humor reminiscent of the Wayans' best sketches on In Living Color. The references to the OJ Simpson case and Bernie Mac as a black police officer who hates black people have also stood the test of time.The title spells it out: Paris Barclay's "Don’t Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood" is a post-"Airplane," pre-"Scary Movie" send-up of 1990s-style urban, African American-centric cinema. Skewering films like "Boys n the Hood," Poetic Justice," and dozens of like-minded cinematic cliches, the film ranges from legitimately funny to uncomfortably tedious. While it is a complete mixed bag, the film's strongest moments make it, at least, watchable.

A parody of several U.S. films about being in the 'Hood', for instance Boyz n the Hood (1991), South Central (1992), Menace II Society (1993), Higher Learning (1995) and Juice (1992).A parody of several U.S. films about being in the 'Hood', for instance Boyz n the Hood (1991), South Central (1992), Menace II Society (1993), Higher Learning (1995) and Juice (1992).A parody of several U.S. films about being in the 'Hood', for instance Boyz n the Hood (1991), South Central (1992), Menace II Society (1993), Higher Learning (1995) and Juice (1992)."Don't Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking your Juice in the Hood" is a parody of several U.S. films about being in the 'Hood', for instance "Boyz n the Hood", "South Central", "Menace II Society", "Higher Learning" and "Juice". We follow Ashtray as he returns to the place he grew up in and meet his father and his basket-case friends. Crazy stuff happens. For example, Ashtray is older than his father and his best friend Loc Dog's grandmother is a trigger-happy old lady who blames her eccentric-looking kid for not being tough enough. (Source: www.imdb.com)

 

 

 

 

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