FutureStarr

Discount Plantsor

Discount Plantsor

Discount Plantsor

To me, there is no thrill like a cheap thrill. I love finding deep discounts of pretty much any type. (Seriously, one time I bought 100 lbs. of sugar in one go simply because it was under $30. Did I need that much sugar? Irrelevant. I rode the high of that bargain for months.) Even if you’re not the “coupon-queen your way to the apocalypse-stockpile of your dreams” type, it’s worth having a few tricks up your sleeve for saving on plants, because they can be costly— yet unlike a hundred pounds of sugar, plants improve your indoor air quality, make your shelves look prettier, and even when they’re half-expired they can be brought back from the brink. Try these cheap plant hacks and you won’t just save money—in some cases, you’ll be rescuing plants from a long dirt nap in a landfill.

Plant

smart shopper like me, but I think people forget to check discount grocery stores like Grocery Outlet and Winco for plants. Nearly thirty years ago, big box bargain stores like Costco started adding houseplants to their inventory, and now even orchids can be found at big box stores, alongside cases of La Croix and corn dogs. If you have a big garden project that’s going to require lots of plants, this will save you tons of money.Bargain-shop for all kinds of plants, but especially in the fall, and especially bulbs. Bulbs are fairly forgiving about sitting around for awhile, and as long as you get them in the ground soon-ish, you’ll get pretty good results. (Confession: a not-insignificant percentage of the bulbs in my yard came from a clearance rack.) You’re not always going to find anything particularly rare or unusual—one time I found Tigridia and Eucomis on a Fred Meyer clearance rack and I bought them out—but if you just need to fill in some gaps in your landscape, paperwhites, callas, tulips, and lilies can fit the bill nicely.

Proplifting is one of my favorite cheap plant hacks because it adds a slightly subversive edge to the already-delightful practice of saving money on plants. If you’re shopping at the hardware store and happen to see a few succulent or begonia leaves on the floor, ask one of the employees if it’s cool to take them home. This is not to be confused with breaking off cuttings or leaves from plants at the store, which I’m sure I don’t have to tell you is actually stealing.If rescuing broken plant bits off the floor feels a tad too extreme, good old-fashioned propagation will work just fine. Houseplant propagation is pretty straightforward, since so many of the plants we grow indoors are in the Araceae family, which is wont to root adventitiously—seriously, roots will grow right out of their stems! Many houseplant cuttings (and herbs) will root right in a glass of water without any rooting hormone or anything. Others take slightly more effort, but learning some basic propagation techniques will pay off in dividends. You can fill your windows with free houseplants, or pot up babies to give as gifts (bonus tip: check thrift stores for funky vintage pots or dress up a plain terra cotta pot with some metallic paint). (Source: www.sunset.com)

 

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