FutureStarr

David Lambert:

David Lambert:

Early cleavages in spiralian embryos are often asymmetric, so that the daughter cells of a division differ in size and developmental fate. We discovered a novel mechanism for segregation of patterning molecules during asymmetric cell divisions. mRNAs of multiple developmental patterning genes are localized to particular centrosomes before they are segregated to specific daughter cells during division. We think this mechanism patterns the animal-vegetal axis of the embryo, by determining the developmental potential of tiers of cells as they are born. Many questions remain about this phenomenon, including what proportion and classes of mRNAs are localized to centrosomes, the mechanism of localization, and the developmental roles of localized patterning molecules. (Source: www.sas.rochester.edu)

I was a comprehensive school geography teacher for 12 years becoming a Deputy Headteacher in 1985. I joined the Institute of Education (IoE) in 1986-7 as a teacher educator, becoming Reader in Education in 1999 and enjoying a spell as Assistant Dean ITE (research). I played a leading role in introducing the Master of Teaching (MTeach) at the Institute. In 2002 I left the IoE to became full-time Chief Executive of the Geographical Association, helping to guide its transformation into a significant provider of CPD and a leader in funded curriculum development activity. From September 2007 I had the opportunity to combine this role with a return to the IoE as Professor of Geography Education. Recent publications include “Geography 11-19: a conceptual approach”, co-written with John Morgan. My overarching goal is to advance the importance of geography in schools, not least its role in helping young people grasp the significance of the Anthropocene. (Source: iris.ucl.ac.uk)

I was a comprehensive school geography teacher for 12 years becoming a Deputy Headteacher in 1985. I joined the Institute of Education (IoE) in 1986-7 as a teacher educator, becoming Reader in Education in 1999 and enjoying a spell as Assistant Dean ITE (research). I played a leading role in introducing the Master of Teaching (MTeach) at the Institute. In 2002 I left the IoE to became full-time Chief Executive of the Geographical Association, helping to guide its transformation into a significant provider of CPD and a leader in funded curriculum development activity. From September 2007 I had the opportunity to combine this role with a return to the IoE as Professor of Geography Education. Recent publications include “Geography 11-19: a conceptual approach”, co-written with John Morgan. My overarching goal is to advance the importance of geography in schools, not least its role in helping young people grasp the significance of the Anthropocene. (Source: iris.ucl.ac.uk)

 

Related Articles