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Daniel Sunjata

Daniel Sunjata

Daniel Sunjata

They’ll also be interviewed by a president who recently took a successful spin through the meat grinder of the NBC. Here’s a clip from his show’s opener, where he tackles a topic that everyone can probably relate to: trying to order a salad during a business networking event.

sunjata

The proper English spelling of Sundiata's name is Sunjata, pronounced soon-jah-ta, approaching the actual pronunciation in the original Mandinka. The name Sogolon derives from his mother and Jata means lion. It is the traditional way of praising someone in some West African societies (Gambia, Senegal, Mali and Guinea in particular). The name Sundiata praises him through his mother which means "the lion of Sogolon" or "Sogolon's lion". The name Jata derives from Jara (lion). Jara and many of its variations such as jata, jala or jada are merely regional variations, from Gambia, Guinea or Mali, for instance. Sundiata's name is thus a derivation of his mother's name Sogolon (Son or its variation Sun) and Jata (lion). (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

^ Conrad, David C., Sunjata: a West African Epic of the Mande peoples (eds David C. Conrad, Djanka Tassey Condé, trans. David C. Conrad), pp. ix, x, xxvi, Hackett Publishing, 2004, (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

^ Conrad, David C., Sunjata: a West African Epic of the Mande peoples (eds David C. Conrad, Djanka Tassey Condé, trans. David C. Conrad), pp. ix, x, xxvi, Hackett Publishing, 2004

Belcher, Stephen. Sinimogo, 'Man for tomorrow': Sunjata on the fringes of the Mande world. .Ralph A Austen (ed.), In Search of Sunjata: The Mande Oral Epic as History, Literature, and Performance (1999): 89-110. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)Austen, Ralph A. "The Historical Transformation of Genres: Sunjata as Panegyric, Folktale, Epic, and Novel." Ralph A Austen (ed.), In Search of Sunjata: The Mande Oral Epic as History, Literature, and Performance (1999): 69–87. (Source:n.wikipedia.org)))

Johnson, John William. "The dichotomy of power and authority in Mande society and in the epic of Sunjata." Ralph A Austen (ed.), In Search of Sunjata: The Mande Oral Epic as History, Literature and Performance (1999): 9-24.

McGuire, James R. 1999. Butchering Heroism?: Sunjata and the Negotiation of Postcolonial Mande Identity in Diabate's Le Boucher de Kouta. In Search of Sunjata: The Mande Oral Epic as History, Literature and Performance, ed. by Ralph Austen, pp. 253–274. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Bulman, Stephen (2004), "A school for epic? The école William Ponty and the evolution of the Sunjata epic, 1913-c. 1960", in Jansen, Jan; Mair, Henk M. J. (eds.), Epic Adventures: Heroic Narrative in the Oral Performance Traditions of Four Continents, Münster: Lit Verlag, pp. 34–45, ISBN

WaliÅ„ski, Grzegorz (1991), "The image of the ruler as presented in the tradition about Sunjata", in PiÅ‚aszewicz, S.; Rzewuski, E. (eds.), Unwritten Testimonies of the African Past. Proceedings of the International Symposium held in Ojrzanów n. Warsaw on 07-08 November 1989 (PDF), Orientalia Varsoviensia 2, Warsaw: Wydawnictwa Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, archived from the original (PDF) on 7 March 2012

The Sundiata Keita or Epic of Sundiata (also referred to as the Sundiata Epic or Sunjata Epic) /sʊnˈdʒɑːtə/ is an epic poem of the Malinke people that tells the story of the hero Sundiata Keita (died 1255), the founder of the Mali Empire. The epic is an instance of oral tradition, going back to the 13th century and narrated by generations of griot poets or jeliw (djeli). There is no single or authoritative version. (Source: en.wikipedia.org)

Bulman, Stephen (2004), "A school for epic? The école William Ponty and the evolution of the Sunjata epic, 1913–c. 1960", in Jansen, Jan; Mair, Henk M. J. (eds.), Epic Adventures: Heroic Narrative in the Oral Performance Traditions of Four Continents, Münster: Lit Verlag, pp. 34–45, ISBN(Source:n.wikipedia.org)))

Austen, Ralph A., ed. (1999), In Search of Sunjata: The Mande Oral Epic as History, Literature and Performance. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. (A collection of 14 articles)))

The epic of Sunjata begins with the hero's childhood. The son of the king of Manding, Sunjata was born under unusual circumstances. His mother was pregnant with him for eight years when a magical spirit called a jinni (or genie) told Sunjata's father that the boy would someday become a great king.

Sunjata lived in the countryside, killing eight hundred elephants and eight thousand lions. However, on the death of his father, he returned to Manding and won a competition against one of his brothers to become king. The young ruler's first task was to kill a terrible beast—a witch in the shape of an animal—that had been terrorizing the people. The old witch was so impressed by Sunjata's kindness and wisdom that she told him how to kill her. He did so and became a hero. Later, Sunjata went to war against a wicked king who claimed his throne. After defeating this demon king with the help of his sister, Sunjata went on to conquer an extensive area that became the empire of Mali. According to legend, Sunjata ruled with fairness and in peace. (Source: www.encyclopedia.com)

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