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Crested Gecko:

Crested Gecko:

Scientists found a new species of gecko after analyzing museum specimens collected more than a century ago. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo. Photo.

Crested Geck

The crested gecko or eyelash gecko (Correlophus ciliatus) is a species of gecko native to southern New Caledonia. In 1866, the crested gecko was described by a French zoologist named Alphonse Guichenot.

Crested Gecko

The crested gecko has hair-like projections found above the eyes, resembling eyelashes. It has a wedge-shaped head and a crest that runs from each eye to the tail. Crested geckos do not have eyelids and so they use their long tongues to moisten their eyes and remove debris. The toes and the tip of the semi-prehensile tail are covered in small hairs called setae. Each seta is divided into hundreds of smaller (approximately 200 nanometres in diameter) hairs called spatulae. It is believed these structures help the gecko climb on most solid surfaces.

Until 1994, the crested gecko was thought to be extinct. Imports to the island of New Caledonia brought a destructive species of ant and rats, which killed many of the native species of geckos on the island. In 1994, a team of researchers on the islands rediscovered the geckos and brought them into captivity. Originally, little was known about them, but through care in captivity, they were found to be easy to keep and breed, and were very prolific. Their ease of care along with their small size, amazing range of color and pattern, and great personality has made them one of the most popular geckos kept in captivity today. (Source: www.zillarules.com)

Crested Geck

The crested gecko or eyelash gecko (Correlophus ciliatus) is a species of gecko native to southern New Caledonia. In 1866, a French zoologist named Alphone Guichenot first described the crested gecko. An expedition in 1994, led by Robert Seipp, rediscovered this species. Along with several Rhacodactylus species, it is being considered for protected status by the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna. It is popular in the pet trade. (Source: reptilia.org)

 

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