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Cranesbill seeds

Cranesbill seeds

Cranesbill seeds

Don't confuse them with the lovely bedding plants called 'geraniums', which belong to the genus Pelargonium and are much more tender (very few are hardy). Hardy geraniums or cranesbills are perennial plants that belong to the genus Geranium and thrive in temperate climates with cool summers and cool summer nights. As would be expected, hardy geraniums are much tougher plants. Most are hardy to USDA zone 5 (-20°F or -29°C) and some are even more cold tolerant, such as Geranium pratense, which can withstand extremely low temperatures (up to -50°F or -45°C).

Cranesbill

Geranium sanguineum carries the common name of bloody cranesbill because its foliage turns a bright crimson in the fall. But, it's an attractive plant all season, in or out of bloom. The foliage is more distinctly cut than other geraniums, giving it a delicate, lacy appearance. The typical cup-shaped flowers come in shades of pink, magenta, and white. G. sanguineum has one of the best bloom displays of all geraniums. The flowers can completely hide the foliage, and repeat blooms can be expected. This plant spreads less quickly than G. endressii and requires little to no care.All plants have a species or Latin name, as well as a common name. The botanical name for cranesbill geraniums is Geranium. However, ‘geranium’ is also the common name for the species Pelargonium. Despite sharing a common name, geraniums (pelargoniums) and cransbills (geraniums) are different species, and have different growing requirements

When you think of a geranium it may be pelargoniums that immediately come to mind. These plants are frequently called common or garden geraniums and have an outstanding prevalence at nurseries and garden centers. Adding to public perception, they are also often marketed as geraniums. However, while pelargoniums feature upright, ball-shaped blooms, true or cranesbill geraniums have flowers comprised of five petals each that span approximately 1/2 to 1-1/2 inches wide dotting a bushy green foliage. You’ll find cranesbill geraniums in shades of purple, blue, white, and pink.It should also be noted that cranesbill geraniums are perennial plants. They will lie dormant in the winter, and then just as spring begins to emerge they will exhibit new growth on their leaves. Their flowering may last throughout the growing season become more and less intense as it cycles. (Source: www.diynetwork.com)

 

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